Category Archives: treatment

Drinking Vinegar Before Bedtime Helps Control Diabetes Says Study – Everyday Diabetes

Drinking Vinegar Before Bedtime Helps Control Diabetes Says Study

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Have type 2 diabetes? A study suggests that you take vinegar before bedtime and it impacts waking glucose concentrations in a good way.

Acetic acid, the active ingredient in vinegar, has an anti-glycemic effect that has been attributed to reduced starch digestion and/or delayed gastric emptying. Why is this important? It may benefit those with type 2 diabetes who experience metabolic disturbances that lead to a pre-breakfast rise in fasting glucose, which is also known as the “dawn phenomenon”.

ABC10 reports:

“For type two diabetes, apple cider vinegar can be very helpful, but it is not recommended for anyone with type 1 diabetes because it can worsen symptoms,” said Karina Knight to ABC10.com, a registered Dietitian and Nutritionist.  When it comes to type 1 diabetes, there have been links that say apple cider vinegar can worsen the glycemic control in your body. This makes it very important for asking your doctor if you are looking to try apple cider vinegar.

Read more here.

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A Thai Liver Parasite Could be the Answer to Wound Healing in Diabetics Says Study – Everyday Diabetes

A Thai Liver Parasite Could be the Answer to Wound Healing in Diabetics Says Study

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Every day 12 Australian diabetics have a limb amputated because of a non-healing wound. Globally, it’s one every 30 seconds.

A molecule produced by a Thai liver parasite could be the solution to those non-healing wounds – and scientists from the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine (AITHM) are now able to produce a version of the molecule on a large enough scale to make it available for laboratory tests and eventually clinical trials.

The molecule is granulin, one of a family of protein growth factors involved with cell proliferation.

“It’s produced by a parasitic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, which originally came to our attention because it causes a liver cancer that kills 26,000 people each year in Thailand,” parasitologist Dr. Michael Smout said.

As part of their work on a potential vaccine to protect people from the parasite, Dr. Smout and colleagues established that the granulin it produces has a hidden talent – it supercharges healing.

“We realized the molecule, discovered in worm spit, could offer a solution for non-healing wounds, which are a problem for diabetics, smokers and the elderly,” he said.

With fellow researchers from the AITHM at James Cook University in Cairns, Dr Smout has been investigating ways to produce granulin in sufficient quantities for larger-scale testing.

The team first tried recombinant DNA techniques, effectively inserting granulin into bacteria, with the aim of producing plentiful supplies of a reliable copy of the molecule.

“Unfortunately, granulin didn’t perform well when we introduced it to E. coli bacteria, so we couldn’t use recombinant techniques to produce a testable supply,” said Professor Norelle Daly, whose research involves exploring the potential of peptides as drug candidates for therapeutic applications.

“We had to go back to the drawing board and find a way to synthesize part of the molecule – to build our own version of designer worm spit,” she said.

The researchers worked to establish which parts of the molecule were critical to wound healing, and to find a way to reproduce the active parts of granulin molecules (peptides).

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed the molecule’s complex shape: a string of amino acids bent into a twisted 3D shape that includes hairpin bends.

“In biology the shape and fold of a molecule can be critical to its function,” Dr. Smout said. “Getting the fold right is important – it can be like the difference between throwing a well-folded paper plane, or tossing a crumpled ball of paper.”

After testing different segments and structures, the team concluded that those hairpin bends were the key.

“They’re held in the twisted 3-D shape by disulfide bonds, and surprisingly we’ve found that by introducing an extra, non-native, bond we can produce peptides that hold the right shape to promote healing,” Professor Daly said.

“You could say we’ve found an extra fold that helps our peptide paper plane fly straight and target wounds.”

The lab-produced granulin peptides have shown great promise in tests, driving cell proliferation in human cells grown in lab plates, and demonstrating potent wound healing in mice.

Now that they can mass-produce perfectly folded, wound-healing peptides, the researchers are looking for potential partners as they progress towards further testing and eventually clinical trials.

“We have plenty of work to do before clinical trials, but we’re confident we have a very strong contender for what could one day be a cream that a diabetic could apply at home, avoiding a lengthy hospital stay and possible amputation,” said Professor Alex Loukas, whose work includes the investigation of hookworm proteins to treat autoimmune and allergic diseases.

“A take-home cream would be a great step forward for those with chronic wounds, and it would also save our health system a great deal of money.

“One in every seven diabetics in Australia will have a non-healing wound at some point, and many suffer amputations as a result. It’s estimated the long hospital stays involved in treating chronic wounds cost our healthcare system AU$3.7 billion per year.”

The research is published in the latest edition of the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

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The Rising Prevalence of Diabetes and its Confounding Complications – Everyday Diabetes

The Rising Prevalence of Diabetes and its Confounding Complications

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Rising Diabetes in G7

New research from Decision Resources Group finds that the prevalent type 2 diabetes (T2D) population in the G7 is rapidly increasing. This increase, from 71.8 million adults to 88.6 million from 2014 to 2024, is driven by rising obesity levels and an aging population across all markets. Rising levels of T2D is a major economic concern, given the high rates of morbidity and mortality, and the cost of its associated comorbidities, such as renal disease. An estimated 47 percent of the T2D population has impaired renal function.

And although the percentage of patients with impaired renal function is expected to stay relatively constant over the next several years, the prevalence will increase in line with the overall T2D population. T2D patients with renal disease, called diabetic nephropathy (DN), are currently prescribed angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs). However, these treatments cannot reverse DN progression. According to primary research, DN is considered the renal disease with the greatest unmet need for new therapeutic options.

Insights from Decision Resources Group’s T2D and DN research:

  • Growth of DN: In the US in 2015, nearly 7 million people have DN. According to findings from PatientBase: Diabetic Nephropathy 2015, the prevalence of DN is expected to increase by nearly 50 percent over the next 20 years. Primary research reveals that 46 percent of patients seen monthly by surveyed nephrologists have DN. This is greater than what is reported by surveyed endocrinologists (26 percent) and primary care physicians (17 percent), according to TreatmentTrends Diabetic Nephropathy 2015 report.
  • Treatment utilization in DN varies depending on physician type: In treating DN, surveyed endocrinologists and primary care physicians report a significantly higher percentage of patients on ACE inhibitors compared with surveyed nephrologists. Conversely, nephrologists report higher use of ARBs. Of the DN patients on an ACE inhibitor, lisinopril (Merck’s Prinivil, AstraZeneca’s Zestril, generics) dominates with nearly 40 percent patient share, while those treated with an ARB are predominately on losartan. Despite these differences, the majority of surveyed physicians agree that disease-modifying treatment is sorely needed.
  • Rapid growth is expected in the market size for both T2D and DN: In T2D, the market is expected to reach over $71 billion, while the DN market will reach peak sales in excess of $1 billion during the 2014-2024 forecast period  In diabetes, the SGLT-2 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists are expected to become the highest grossing drug classes in the treatment of T2D by 2024, with sales of approximately $15 billion for each class. In DN, novel therapies such as AbbVie’s atrasentan, NephroGenex’s Pyridorin, and Bayer’s finerenone, among others, are poised to meaningfully impact treatment decisions due to their potential to modify the disease and halt its progression. AbbVie’s atrasentan is expected to reach the market first followed closely by Bayer’s finerenerone.

“The pipeline for DN has been rapidly growing,” said Decision Resources Group Analyst Caitlin Koris.

“The rising prevalence of T2D, and consequently DN, will impose increasing strain on healthcare budgets globally.”

“There are four agents in late-stage development, all with unique mechanisms of action and enrolling in Phase III clinical programs. There are several more agents in the early-stage development pipeline. While there have been noticeable failures in the past, interviewed nephrologists are excited about the first potential disease-modifying agent. Assuming regulatory approvals, surveyed physicians have indicated high patient share for these agents among their CKD-ND and dialysis patient populations.”

For more information on the findings you can visit DRG on the web.

SOURCE Decision Resources Group

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Omega-3 Therapy as a Treatment for Diabetes Says Studies – Everyday Diabetes

Omega-3 Therapy as a Treatment for Diabetes Says Studies

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If you’re a fish lover and diabetic, then you probably should not stop eating fish. A recent study shows that omega-3 therapy may help treat diabetes.

Chinese researchers said Tuesday they have developed a gene therapeutic approach that may allow the body to produce enough omega-3 fatty acids to reverse the onset of type 1 diabetes. The work, led by Professor Allan Zhao of the Guangdong University of Technology and published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, may offer the hope of curing this autoimmune condition that affects millions of children and young adults worldwide.

Medicalnewstoday reports:

“Our observations may also offer clinical guidance, in that those patients who are either at the early-onset stage of [type 1 diabetes] or have consistently had good management of their blood glucose levels may benefit the most from these interventions. These treatment modalities, if cleared in safety evaluations, may potentially be helpful in the treatment of other types of autoimmune diseases as well,” Zhao tells Medicalnewstoday.

Read more here.

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Troubled Novo Nordisk Committed to Insulin Market ‘Whatever it Costs’ – Everyday Diabetes

Troubled Novo Nordisk Committed to Insulin Market ‘Whatever it Costs’

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Slumping prices for insulin products in the U.S. market have forced Novo Nordisk and other producers of insulin into the position of having to reduce or flatten their prices as powerful middlemen that buy drugs on behalf of insurers and employers seek better deals, reports the Wall Street Journal.

Read More: Ask Dr. Sally: Help! Will I be able to Fit in my Tux for Friend’s Wedding?

For Novo Nordisk this is especially apparent as the company last week lowered long-term profit guidance to 5 percent from 10 percent –an announcement that saw the company’s shares drop by as much as 19 percent, its worst selloff in 14 years.

Novo Nordisk Chief Executive Lars Rebien Sorensen told Reuters on Friday that the Danish company remains committed to the U.S. insulin market, where price pressure are expected to continue into 2019.

“We have no intentions of leaving the U.S. market, whatever it costs,” Sorensen said following the company’s release of third-quarter results.

 

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Pancreatic Islet Transplant Achieved Insulin Independence – Everyday Diabetes

Pancreatic Islet Transplant Achieved Insulin Independence

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Scientists from the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have produced the first clinical results demonstrating that pancreatic islet cells transplanted within a tissue-engineered platform can successfully engraft and achieve insulin independence in type 1 diabetes. The findings, published in the May 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, are part of an ongoing clinical study to test this novel strategy as an important step toward offering this life-changing cell replacement therapy to millions living with the disease.

Islet transplantation has demonstrated the ability to restore natural insulin production and eliminate severe hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes. The insulin-producing cells have traditionally been implanted within the liver, but this transplant site poses some limitations for emerging applications, leading researchers to investigate other options. DRI scientists have focused on the omentum, an apron-like tissue covering abdominal organs, which is easily accessed with minimally invasive surgery and has the same blood supply and physiological drainage characteristics as the pancreas.

“The objective of testing this novel tissue-engineered platform is to initially determine that insulin-producing cells can function in this new site, and subsequently introduce additional technologies towards our ultimate goal to replace the pancreatic endocrine function lost in type 1 diabetes without the need for anti-rejection drugs, what we call the DRI BioHub,” explains Camillo Ricordi, M.D., director of the DRI and the Stacy Joy Goodman Professor of Surgery, Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Miami Miller School. Dr. Ricordi also serves as director of the DRI’s Cell Transplant Center.

This was the first successful tissue-engineered “mini pancreas” that has achieved long-term insulin independence in a patient with type 1 diabetes. The biological platform was made by combining donor islets with the patient’s own (autologous) blood plasma, which was laparoscopically layered onto the omentum. Clinical-grade thrombin was then layered over the islet/plasma mixture. Together, these substances create a gel-like material that sticks to the omentum and holds the islets in place. Over time, the body will absorb the gel, leaving the islets intact. The technique has been designed to minimize the inflammatory reaction that is normally observed when islets are implanted in the liver or in other sites with immediate contact to blood. The DRI’s clinical trial, an important first step toward developing the BioHub mini organ, includes the immunosuppressive regimen currently used for clinical islet transplantation studies.

“The results thus far have shown that the omentum appears to be a viable site for islet implantation using this new platform technique,” said lead author David Baidal, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine and member of the DRI’s Clinical Cell Transplant team. “Data from our study and long-term follow up of additional omental islet transplants will determine the safety and feasibility of this strategy of islet transplantation, but we are quite excited about what we are seeing now.”

In type 1 diabetes, the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas have been mistakenly destroyed by the immune system, requiring patients to manage their blood sugar levels through a daily regimen of insulin therapy. Islet transplantation has allowed many patients to live without the need for insulin injections after receiving a transplant of donor cells. Some patients who have received islet transplants at the DRI have been insulin independent for more than a decade, as DRI researchers have published.

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FDA Approves Adlyxin for Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes in Adults – Everyday Diabetes

FDA Approves Adlyxin for Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes in Adults

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the drug Adlyxin, a once a day injection that along with diet and exercise improves blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes.

“The FDA continues to support the development of new drug therapies for diabetes management,” said Mary Thanh Hai Parks, M.D., deputy director, Office of Drug Evaluation II in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

“Adlyxin will add to the available treatment options to control blood sugar levels for those with type 2.”

The drug’s safety and effectiveness were evaluated in 10 clinical trials that enrolled 5,400 patients with type 2 diabetes. In these trials, Adlyxin was evaluated both as a standalone therapy and in combination with other FDA-approved diabetic medications, including metformin, sulfonylureas, pioglitazone and basal insulin.

Use of Adlyxin improved hemoglobin A1c levels (a measure of blood sugar levels) in these trials.

The FDA added that Adlyxin should not be used to treat people with type 1 diabetes or patients with increased ketones in their blood or urine –known as diabetic ketoacidosis.

“The approval of Adlyxin reaffirms our continued commitment to addressing the challenges faced by people living with diabetes when trying to reach and maintain their individual blood glucose (HbA1c) targets,” said Peter Guenter, Executive Vice President, Head, Global Diabetes & Cardiovascular Business Unit, Sanofi.

“We are pleased with this approval, as it offers us the opportunity to continue helping patients treated with basal insulin who remain uncontrolled.”

Common side effects

The most common side effects associated with Adlyxin are nausea, vomiting, headache, diarrhea and dizziness. Hypoglycemia in patients treated with both Adlyxin and other antidiabetic drugs such as sulfonylurea and/or basal insulin is another common side effect. In addition, severe hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, were reported in clinical trials of Adlyxin.

Adlyxin is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis U.S. LLC, of Bridgewater, New Jersey.

Type 2 diabetes affects more than 29 million people and accounts for more than 90 percent of diabetes cases diagnosed in the United States. Over time, high blood sugar levels can increase the risk for serious complications, including heart disease, blindness and nerve and kidney damage

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Diabetes 101 – EveryDay Diabetes Magazine

DIABETES 101

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes and you’re on the road to understanding what it all means, your journey starts here.
Here you will find helpful information about diabetes, the lifestyle changes, what you can eat, how you should take care of yourself and more.
A place you can start to make changes in your life for the better.
The Basics About Diabetes - Everyday Diabetes Magazine

The Basics

Diagnosed with diabetes and not sure what it’s all about? Here are the basics to get started. (read more)

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. (read more)

Type 2 Diabetes

Usually discovered in adulthood, it is found increasingly more in young people. (read more)

What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A person’s fasting blood glucose can be measured, or they can take an oral glucose tolerance test determine if they have pre-diabetes. You can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes by keeping to a exercise and diet strategy designed to reduce excess pounds.

Diabetes 101 – EveryDay Diabetes Magazine

DIABETES 101

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes and you’re on the road to understanding what it all means, your journey starts here.
Here you will find helpful information about diabetes, the lifestyle changes, what you can eat, how you should take care of yourself and more.
A place you can start to make changes in your life for the better.
The Basics About Diabetes - Everyday Diabetes Magazine

The Basics

Diagnosed with diabetes and not sure what it’s all about? Here are the basics to get started. (read more)

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. (read more)

Type 2 Diabetes

Usually discovered in adulthood, it is found increasingly more in young people. (read more)

What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A person’s fasting blood glucose can be measured, or they can take an oral glucose tolerance test determine if they have pre-diabetes. You can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes by keeping to a exercise and diet strategy designed to reduce excess pounds.

Doctors Prescribe Diabetes Meds 15 times More than Obesity Meds, study finds – Everyday Diabetes

Doctors Prescribe Diabetes Meds 15 times More than Obesity Meds, study finds

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Even with the close tie between obesity and type 2 diabetes, new research shows that healthcare clinicians prescribe 15 times more antidiabetes medications than those for obesity.

Obesity is a well-established major risk factor for developing diabetes, with almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes having obesity or overweight.

According to a release:

Although six antiobesity medications are now approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating obesity when combined with a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity, this research points out that only 2% of the eligible 46% of the U.S. adult population is receiving these medications. The research is published in the September issue of Obesity, the scientific journal of The Obesity Society.

“Given the close tie between obesity and type 2 diabetes, treating obesity should be an obvious first step for healthcare providers to prevent and treat diabetes,” says Catherine E. Thomas, MS, the lead researcher from Weill Medical College of Cornell University. “By treating obesity, we may be able to decrease the number of patients with type 2 diabetes, among other related diseases and the medications used to treat them.”

Researchers pointed to a number of barriers to obesity treatment including lack of reimbursement for healthcare providers, limited time during office visits, lack of training in counseling, and competing demands, among others. 

“A greater urgency in the treatment of obesity – on the part of clinicians and patients – is essential,” continued Thomas. “We’re talking about prolonged and better quality of life for patients.” 

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Doctors Prescribe Diabetes Meds 15 times More than Obesity Meds, study finds – Everyday Diabetes

Doctors Prescribe Diabetes Meds 15 times More than Obesity Meds, study finds

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Even with the close tie between obesity and type 2 diabetes, new research shows that healthcare clinicians prescribe 15 times more antidiabetes medications than those for obesity.

Obesity is a well-established major risk factor for developing diabetes, with almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes having obesity or overweight.

According to a release:

Although six antiobesity medications are now approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating obesity when combined with a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity, this research points out that only 2% of the eligible 46% of the U.S. adult population is receiving these medications. The research is published in the September issue of Obesity, the scientific journal of The Obesity Society.

“Given the close tie between obesity and type 2 diabetes, treating obesity should be an obvious first step for healthcare providers to prevent and treat diabetes,” says Catherine E. Thomas, MS, the lead researcher from Weill Medical College of Cornell University. “By treating obesity, we may be able to decrease the number of patients with type 2 diabetes, among other related diseases and the medications used to treat them.”

Researchers pointed to a number of barriers to obesity treatment including lack of reimbursement for healthcare providers, limited time during office visits, lack of training in counseling, and competing demands, among others. 

“A greater urgency in the treatment of obesity – on the part of clinicians and patients – is essential,” continued Thomas. “We’re talking about prolonged and better quality of life for patients.” 

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Asia Pacific Diabetes Treatment to hit $10 Billion by 2021 – Everyday Diabetes

Asia Pacific Diabetes Treatment to hit $10 Billion by 2021

Type 2 diabetes is becoming an increasingly common problem in Asia as the region becomes more industrialized and diets become more Westernized.

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A new report from business intelligence provider GBI Research says that the Asia-Pacific treatment market for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) will increase from a little under $6.1 billion in 2014 to just over $10 billion by 2021.

The report, showed that strong market growth will occur across the APAC countries of China, India, Japan and Australia. It will be driven by the rapidly expanding prevalence population resulting from increasingly aging populations and sedentary lifestyles. Higher diagnosis and treatment rates, due to rising disease awareness among the public, will also play a role.

Senior Analyst Aswini Nath says: “T2DM is becoming an increasingly common problem in APAC regions as they become more industrialized and diets become more Westernized. In line with this, there is a very large and innovative pipeline, suggesting a strong potential for unmet needs to be addressed in coming years.

“The late-stage pipeline contains a high proportion of products from established drug classes, with improved dosing regimens and administration routes in comparison to currently marketed products. This suggests that unmet needs relating to patient convenience and ease of use will be addressed most significantly over the forecast period.”

GBI Research also states that the recently approved drug classes, GLP-1 receptor agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and SGLT-2 inhibitors, are expected to increase their market share by 2021.

Nath continues: “In comparison to many previously marketed therapies, the new drug classes provide beneficial effects such as improved weight control and lowered hypoglycemia risk. Furthermore, a recent study also identified cardiovascular risk reduction with Jardiance, an SGLT-2 inhibitor.

“These treatments have already achieved strong market uptake, which is expected to increase over the forecast period. The recently launched products in the APAC region that are expected to contribute most significantly to market growth include Forxiga, Invokana, Jardiance, Zafatek, and Tenglyn/Ziten.”

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About Us – Everyday Diabetes

About Us

Welcome!

EveryDay Diabetes is an online digital information news source for people with diabetes to provide them with the necessary tools, clarity and confidence to win at work, succeed in life and reach their potential.

Our goal is simple – to provide reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.

Our digital magazine, EveryDay Diabetes, offers up-to-date news, practical information on food & drink, body & mind, gadgets & tech, lifestyle & leisure, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.

On this website, you’ll find a variety of tips, knowledge, and insights about diabetes self-care written by health-care professionals and people with diabetes, as well as reports about late-breaking diabetes news. You can also sign up for our free newsletter and receive the latest diabetes news delivered straight to your inbox.

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Publisher: Michael Conforme
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Editor in Chief: Bobby McGill
editor@everydaydiabetes.com
Partnerships & Marketing: Emma Kim
partners@everydaydiabetes.com 
Copy Editor: Michael Reese
Contributing Writers:

About Us – Everyday Diabetes

About Us

Welcome!

EveryDay Diabetes is an online digital information news source for people with diabetes to provide them with the necessary tools, clarity and confidence to win at work, succeed in life and reach their potential.

Our goal is simple – to provide reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.

Our digital magazine, EveryDay Diabetes, offers up-to-date news, practical information on food & drink, body & mind, gadgets & tech, lifestyle & leisure, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.

On this website, you’ll find a variety of tips, knowledge, and insights about diabetes self-care written by health-care professionals and people with diabetes, as well as reports about late-breaking diabetes news. You can also sign up for our free newsletter and receive the latest diabetes news delivered straight to your inbox.

Contact us

Your Name (required)

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Everyday Diabetes Staff

Publisher: Michael Conforme
publisher@everydaydiabetes.com
Editor in Chief: Bobby McGill
editor@everydaydiabetes.com
Partnerships & Marketing: Emma Kim
partners@everydaydiabetes.com 
Copy Editor: Michael Reese
Contributing Writers: