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App to Take Better Photos of your Food – Because You Know you Want Too – Everyday Diabetes

App to Take Better Photos of your Food – Because You Know you Want Too

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So you like taking photos of your food, do you? Now there’s a special app for that.

Developed by the Line Corporation, which operates Line Messenger service and South Korean internet leviathan, Naver, the specialized photo app is called, rather uncreatively, “Foodie.”

While billed as being “A camera app customized for food photos,” aside of special “food filters”, an auto-blurring SLR effect, Foodie is pretty much like any other camera app.

Though it does have an interesting feature.

When you’re trying to get the perfect shot of your food from above, Foodie lets you know your phone is positioned perfectly horizontal over your meal.

From blah to boom! Or so they say.

From blah to boom!

“The app’s ‘best angle’ feature lets the user know through vibration and color when the camera is positioned horizontally above the subject, it’s a snap to take trendy flat lays like you’d see in a gourmet magazine,” Line said on their blog.

So, there’s that.

It also features 24 food filters such as “Meats,” “Sushi,” “Cakes,” and other cuisine-specific settings that will make your next dish look its absolute food porn best.

“Going forward, Foodie will continue to develop food-specific features, such as filters and effects, that allow users to have more enjoyable and enriching communication experiences through food photos,” says Line.

Perhaps that next bowl of mac n’ cheese will jump off the screen.

All joking aside, if the before and after photos are any indication, it will likely be a hit on the app store. We’re certainly going to take it for a spin at our next meal.

One minor irritant is that the app logo watermark appears on your photos unless you switch the feature off in the settings.

Bon appet-click!

Food App take better food photos Foodie - Branding in Asia Magazine


Foodie is available for free on iOS and Android.

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Regenerative Bandage That Heals Diabetic Wounds Faster – Everyday Diabetes

Regenerative Bandage That Heals Diabetic Wounds Faster

Researchers have created an antioxidant bandage that delivers healing proteins.

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It is estimated that 15 percent of people with diabetes will, at some point in their lives, develop a painful and hard-to-treat foot ulcer. Of that 15 percent, Twenty-four percent will require a lower-leg amputation.

In some cases, what was first thought to be a harmless sore could even lead to death.

That’s why there is hope in a new treatment developed by a Northwestern Engineering team called a “regenerative bandage.” Made with advanced materials, it is designed to heal diabetic wounds four times faster than a standard bandage.

“By mimicking the repair process that happens in a healthy body, we have demonstrated a promising new way to treat diabetic wounds.”

“Foot ulcers cause many serious problems for diabetic patients,” said Guillermo Ameer, professor of biomedical engineering in the McCormick School of Engineering and surgery in the Feinberg School of Medicine. “Some sores don’t heal fast enough and are prone t oinfection. We thought that we could use some of our work in biomaterials for medical applications and controlled drug release to help heal those wounds.”

According to a release from Northwestern:

Some promising treatments for these chronic wounds exist, but they are costly and can come with significant side effects. One gel, for example, contains a growth factor that has been reported to increase cancer risk with overuse.

“It should not be acceptable for patients who are trying to heal an open sore to have to deal with an increased risk of cancer due to treating the wound,” Ameer said.

Dr. ameer-guillermo
Dr. Guillermo Ameer

Ameer’s laboratory previously created a thermo-responsive material — with intrinsic antioxidant properties to counter inflammation — that is able to deliver therapeutic cells and proteins.

His team used this material to slowly release into the wound a protein that hastens the body’s ability to repair itself by recruiting stem cells to the wound and creating new blood vessels to increase blood circulation.

“We incorporated a protein that our body naturally uses to attract repair cells to an injury site,” Ameer said. “When the protein is secreted, progenitor cells or stem cells come to the wound and make blood vessels, which is part of the repair process.”

The thermo-responsive material is applied to the wound bed as a liquid and solidifies into a gel when exposed to body temperature. When the same amount of the protein was directly applied all at once, no benefit was observed. This demonstrates the importance of slow release from the thermo-responsive material. Ameer believes that the inherent antioxidant properties within the material also reduce oxidative stress to help the wound heal.

“The ability of the material to reversibly go from liquid to solid with temperature changes protects the wound,” Ameer said. “Patients have to change the wound dressing often, which can rip off healing tissue and re-injure the site. Our material conforms to the shape and dimensions of the wound and can be rinsed off with cooled saline, if needed. This material characteristic can protect the regenerating tissue during dressing changes.”

In collaboration with Zhang, Ameer imaged diabetic wounds to discover that they were much healthier after application of the regenerative bandage. The blood flow to the wound was significantly higher than in those without Ameer’s bandage.

“The repair process is impaired in people with diabetes,” Ameer said. “By mimicking the repair process that happens in a healthy body, we have demonstrated a promising new way to treat diabetic wounds.”

 

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Pokemon Go: The Hottest Fitness App on the Market? – Everyday Diabetes

Pokemon Go: The Hottest Fitness App on the Market?

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Fitness tracker Jawbone UP has released data saying that users of its fitness band who also mentioned that they used Pokémon Go logged 62.5 percent more steps over the past weekend than they did on normal weekends.

Pokemon Go Fitness

That’s just one of many reports of people using the app, unintentionally (or intentionally) to get in shape.

Even a policeman in South Carolina has created a fitness routine based around the app.

“There have been so many posts online of people saying, ‘I haven’t walked this far in years, I’m actually starting to lose weight from catching Pokemon’,” Garrett said. “So I figured to take it that step further, you know, and add some interval training exercises in there.”

He launched a PokeFitness website which has workouts to do while trying to catch ’em all.

What’s going on?

For those not in the know, Pokémon GO is an app, built by Nintendo and Niantic, Inc., in cooperation with The Pokémon Group.

The Nintendo-owned franchise was wildly popular in the late 1990s and now it’s back through Pokémon Go, now available for a free download on Android and iOS.

Though technically a mobile game, it uses several smartphone technologies—GPS and camera, mostly—to merge the fictional, digital world of Pikachus and Pokémon Gyms with the physical world.

Along with that there are digital monsters to capture and digital Pokémon gyms where you go to train your team. (For a more detailed understanding go here.)


The endorsements of the fitness benefits are rolling in.

Some are quite hilarious

Others are just a simple singing of its praises:

Now we’ll be curious to see if Nintendo takes advantage of the trend and turns Pokémon Go Plus into a fitness tracker that it is turning out to be!

The Bluetooth accessory has already become so popular that it’s sold out on Amazon.)

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We pride ourselves on being a comprehensive resource for diabetes related news, health and fitness and lifestyle articles, but more than that, we want to do all we can to contribute to the betterment of our readers’ lives.

If your business or organization is interested in partnering with us on this mission, we’d love to talk to you more.

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Fitness Tracker Hidden in Your Glasses being Developed by Former Google Glass Partner – Everyday Diabetes

Fitness Tracker Hidden in Your Glasses being Developed by Former Google Glass Partner

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Eye care product and service provider VSP is partnering up with the University of Southern California for a four-month pilot study on VSP’s fitness tracking glasses called Level.

Called “Project Genesis”, the study will have users test a prototype wearable and smartphone app that monitors their activity.

VSP has previously worked with Google offering subsidized frames with prescription lenses for Google Glass.

Founded in 1955 by a group of optometrists in offer products and services to eye care professionals, employers, and more than 80 million members worldwide.

The high tech glasses, when viewed from the front, like ordinary glasses. Hidden in the left arm is an accelerometer, a gyroscope and a magnetometer to track step count, calories, distance travelled and activity.

There is also a battery and Bluetooth that allows you to pair with an included smartphone app, and it offers a location feature called ‘Find My Glasses’.

“The new Level frames forced us to reimagine the entire design and manufacturing process for eyewear,” said Leslie Muller, co-lead of VSP Global’s innovation lab, The Shop.

“Designers collaborated with firmware and biomedical engineers, who collaborated with traditional eyewear craftspeople to produce so

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A Fitness Tracker and a Glam Accessory in One – Everyday Diabetes

A Fitness Tracker and a Glam Accessory in One

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Say goodbye to gigantic watches that will never fit your day to day outfits or running shoes that you only wear when you’re working out. There is a new fitness tracker in town and it comes in the form of a ring!The Motiv ring is a heart rate sensor, fitness tracker, and sleep tracker, and it’s about the size of a wedding band. And you can wear this 24/7, unless when you need to charge it for 90 minutes (battery claims to last for 5 days though).

BussinessInsider reports:

The ring is designed to be worn on your hand 24 hours a day, and its charge lasts for up to five days. When it does need to be charged, it just sits on a small charger you can attach to your keychain.

Motiv has been working on the ring for the past five years to make it as small and slim as possible while still counting your steps, tracking your runs, and helping you get a sound sleep.

Read more here.

 

 

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Diabetes 101 – EveryDay Diabetes Magazine

DIABETES 101

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes and you’re on the road to understanding what it all means, your journey starts here.
Here you will find helpful information about diabetes, the lifestyle changes, what you can eat, how you should take care of yourself and more.
A place you can start to make changes in your life for the better.
The Basics About Diabetes - Everyday Diabetes Magazine

The Basics

Diagnosed with diabetes and not sure what it’s all about? Here are the basics to get started. (read more)

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. (read more)

Type 2 Diabetes

Usually discovered in adulthood, it is found increasingly more in young people. (read more)

What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A person’s fasting blood glucose can be measured, or they can take an oral glucose tolerance test determine if they have pre-diabetes. You can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes by keeping to a exercise and diet strategy designed to reduce excess pounds.

Diabetes 101 – EveryDay Diabetes Magazine

DIABETES 101

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes and you’re on the road to understanding what it all means, your journey starts here.
Here you will find helpful information about diabetes, the lifestyle changes, what you can eat, how you should take care of yourself and more.
A place you can start to make changes in your life for the better.
The Basics About Diabetes - Everyday Diabetes Magazine

The Basics

Diagnosed with diabetes and not sure what it’s all about? Here are the basics to get started. (read more)

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. (read more)

Type 2 Diabetes

Usually discovered in adulthood, it is found increasingly more in young people. (read more)

What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A person’s fasting blood glucose can be measured, or they can take an oral glucose tolerance test determine if they have pre-diabetes. You can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes by keeping to a exercise and diet strategy designed to reduce excess pounds.

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Can Your Smartphone Control Diabetes? Here’s How. – Everyday Diabetes

Can Your Smartphone Control Diabetes? Here’s How.

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Cells engineered to produce insulin under the command of a smartphone helped keep blood sugar levels within normal limits in diabetic mice, a new study reports.

More than 415 million people worldwide are living with diabetes, and frequently need to inject themselves with insulin to manage their blood sugars. Human cells can be genetically engineered into living factories that efficiently manufacture and deliver hormones and signaling molecules, but most synthetic biological circuits don’t offer the same degree of sensitivity and precision as digital sensors.

Combining living tissues and technology, Jiawei Shao et al. created custom cells that produced insulin when illuminated by far-red light (the same wavelengths emitted by therapy bulbs and infrared saunas). The researchers added the cells to a soft bio-compatible sheath that also contained wirelessly-powered red LED lights to create HydrogeLEDs that could be turned on and off by an external electromagnetic field. Implanting the HydrogeLEDs into the skin of diabetic mice allowed Shao and colleagues to administer insulin doses remotely through a smartphone application.

They not only custom-coded the smartphone control algorithms, but designed the engineered cells to produce insulin without any “cross-talk” between normal cellular signaling processes. The scientists went on to pair the system with a Bluetooth-enabled blood glucose meter, creating instant feedback between the therapeutic cells and the diagnostic device that helped diabetic animals rapidly achieve and maintain stable blood glucose levels in a small pilot experiment over a period of several weeks.

The authors say that successfully linking digital signals with engineered cells represents an important step toward translating similar cell-based therapies into the clinic. A related Focus by Mark Gomelsky highlights the findings further.

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An App that Counts Calories by Taking Photos of your Food – That’s Cool – Everyday Diabetes

An App that Counts Calories by Taking Photos of your Food – That’s Cool

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Tired of trying to figure out how to count calories easily? Popular health app, Lose It! is working out new technologies that will make easy it as possible by allowing you to track the calories and nutritional information in what you’re eating simply with a photo.

The new technology, which is now available on the app, is still in its early stages, but little by little, calorie logging is getting easier and easier.

According to a report in MIT Technology Review, the app has artificial intelligence that guesses what the food is in your photo. If it’s right, you just let it know details like portion size and it will spit out a calorie count.

“Cornell, SRI International, and Google have already built similar food-recognition technology for research purposes. Lose It CEO Charles Teague says his team took a similar approach, but will augment what the camera sees with intelligence gained from its users. The app already uses details such as GPS and the popularity of varieties of different foods to make better guesses,” said MIT.

Like we said, the technology still has a way to go. As this user can attest:

That’s pretty funny and perhaps disappointing, but this is exciting stuff to look forward too!

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Big Tech Companies on Diabetes Management Solutions – Everyday Diabetes

Big Tech Companies on Diabetes Management Solutions

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Apple ain’t the only one working on technological solutions to help manage diabetes, Amazon and IBM have joined the bandwagon (or perhaps pioneered even before Apple). Amazon has partnered with pharmaceutical giant Merck & Co., Inc. and is challenging developers to create Alexa-powered solutions to improve the lives of people managing Type 2 diabetes.

International Business Machines Corporation, on the other hand, is working with Medtronic plc to develop a new generation of personalized diabetes management solutions.

Medpagetoday.com reports:

Now thanks to a partnership between Amazon, Luminary Labs, and Merck, Alexa might soon be able to help those with diabetes self-manage the condition. The Alexa Diabetes Challenge is accepting submissions from now until Monday, May 22, 2017, at 5 p.m, ET. Up to five finalists, all who receive $25,000, will be announced in July and placed into a “virtual accelerator” for prototype development, and in September, a winner will be announced.

Read more here.

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Weight Loss Stomach Pump AspireAssist Approved by the FDA – Everyday Diabetes

Weight Loss Stomach Pump AspireAssist Approved by the FDA

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AspireAssist Stomach Pump

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new obesity treatment device that uses a surgically-placed tube to drain a portion of the stomach contents after every meal.

The AspireAssist device should not be used on patients with eating disorders, and it is not intended to be used for short durations in those who are moderately overweight. It is intended to assist in weight loss in patients aged 22 and older who are obese, with a body mass index of 35 to 55, and who have failed to achieve and maintain weight loss through non-surgical weight-loss therapy.

“The AspireAssist device should not be used on patients with eating disorders, and it is not intended to be used for short durations in those who are moderately overweight.”

“The AspireAssist approach helps provide effective control of calorie absorption, which is a key principle of weight management therapy,” said William Maisel, M.D., M.P.H., deputy director for science and chief scientist in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “Patients need to be regularly monitored by their health care provider and should follow a lifestyle program to help them develop healthier eating habits and reduce their calorie intake.”

To place the device, surgeons insert a tube in the stomach with an endoscope via a small incision in the abdomen. A disk-shaped port valve that lies outside the body, flush against the skin of the abdomen, is connected to the tube and remains in place. Approximately 20 to 30 minutes after meal consumption, the patient attaches the device’s external connector and tubing to the port valve, opens the valve and drains the contents. Once opened, it takes approximately five to 10 minutes to drain food matter through the tube and into the toilet. The device removes approximately 30 percent of the calories consumed.

The FDA reviewed results from a clinical trial of 111 patients treated with AspireAssist and appropriate lifestyle therapy, and 60 control patients who received only the lifestyle therapy. After one year, patients using AspireAssist lost an average of 12.1 percent of their total body weight compared to 3.6 percent for the control patients.

Clinical trial results also suggested that both patient groups had small improvements in conditions often associated with obesity, such as diabetes, hypertension and quality of life. These improvements may be attributable to the lifestyle therapy, which includes nutrition and exercise counseling.

Patients require frequent monitoring by a health care provider to shorten the tube as they lose weight and abdominal girth, so that the disk remains flush against their skin. Frequent medical visits are also necessary to monitor device use and weight loss and to provide counseling on lifestyle therapies. The device also has a safety feature that keeps track of the number of times the drain tube is connected to the port and automatically stops working after 115 cycles (approximately five to six weeks of therapy); patients must return for a medical visit to get a replacement part for the device in order to continue the therapy. This safety feature helps ensure patients use the device properly during therapy.

Side effects related to use of the AspireAssist include occasional indigestion, nausea, vomiting, constipation and diarrhea.

The endoscopic surgical placement of the gastric tube is associated with risks, including sore throat, pain, abdominal bloating, indigestion, bleeding, infection, nausea, vomiting, sedation-related breathing problems, inflammation of the lining of the abdomen, sores on the inside of the stomach, pneumonia, unintended puncture of the stomach or intestinal wall and death.

Risks related to the abdominal opening for the port valve include abdominal discomfort or pain, irritation, hardening or inflammation of the skin around the site where the tube is placed, leakage, bleeding and/or infection around the site where the tube is placed and device migration into the stomach wall. All have the potential to necessitate removal of the device. After device removal, there may be a risk of persistent fistula, an abnormal passageway between the stomach and the abdominal wall.

AspireAssist is contraindicated in those with certain conditions, including uncontrolled hypertension, diagnosed bulimia, diagnosed binge eating disorder, night eating syndrome, certain types of previous abdominal surgery, pregnancy or lactation, inflammatory bowel disease or stomach ulcers. AspireAssist is also contraindicated in patients with a history of serious pulmonary or cardiovascular disease, coagulation disorders, chronic abdominal pain or those at a high risk of medical complications from an endoscopic procedure.

The AspireAssist System is manufactured by Aspire Bariatrics located in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.

(Release from FDA)

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About Us – Everyday Diabetes

About Us

Welcome!

EveryDay Diabetes is an online digital information news source for people with diabetes to provide them with the necessary tools, clarity and confidence to win at work, succeed in life and reach their potential.

Our goal is simple – to provide reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.

Our digital magazine, EveryDay Diabetes, offers up-to-date news, practical information on food & drink, body & mind, gadgets & tech, lifestyle & leisure, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.

On this website, you’ll find a variety of tips, knowledge, and insights about diabetes self-care written by health-care professionals and people with diabetes, as well as reports about late-breaking diabetes news. You can also sign up for our free newsletter and receive the latest diabetes news delivered straight to your inbox.

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Publisher: Michael Conforme
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Editor in Chief: Bobby McGill
editor@everydaydiabetes.com
Partnerships & Marketing: Emma Kim
partners@everydaydiabetes.com 
Copy Editor: Michael Reese
Contributing Writers:

About Us – Everyday Diabetes

About Us

Welcome!

EveryDay Diabetes is an online digital information news source for people with diabetes to provide them with the necessary tools, clarity and confidence to win at work, succeed in life and reach their potential.

Our goal is simple – to provide reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.

Our digital magazine, EveryDay Diabetes, offers up-to-date news, practical information on food & drink, body & mind, gadgets & tech, lifestyle & leisure, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.

On this website, you’ll find a variety of tips, knowledge, and insights about diabetes self-care written by health-care professionals and people with diabetes, as well as reports about late-breaking diabetes news. You can also sign up for our free newsletter and receive the latest diabetes news delivered straight to your inbox.

Contact us

Your Name (required)

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Subject

Your Message

Everyday Diabetes Staff

Publisher: Michael Conforme
publisher@everydaydiabetes.com
Editor in Chief: Bobby McGill
editor@everydaydiabetes.com
Partnerships & Marketing: Emma Kim
partners@everydaydiabetes.com 
Copy Editor: Michael Reese
Contributing Writers: