Category Archives: food drink

Wonderful Walnuts – Weight Loss and Improved Cholesterol Levels Among the Perks – Everyday Diabetes

Wonderful Walnuts – Weight Loss and Improved Cholesterol Levels Among the Perks

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A new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that a diet containing unsaturated fats, such as those found in walnuts and olive oil, has similar weight loss effects as a lower fat, higher-carbohydrate diet. The research, led by Dr. Cheryl Rock of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, also showed that a diet containing walnuts, which are primarily comprised of polyunsaturated fats, positively impacts heart health markers, such as cholesterol.

“One of the surprising findings of this study was that even though walnuts are higher in fat and calories, the walnut-rich diet was associated with the same degree of weight loss as a lower fat diet,” said Dr. Rock. “Considering the results of this study, as well as previous walnut research on heart health and weight, there’s something to be said for eating a handful of walnuts a day.”

To reach their findings, the research team studied 245 overweight and obese women (22-72 years old) enrolled in a one-year behavioral weight loss intervention. Participants were randomly assigned to three different diets: 1) a lower fat and higher carbohydrate diet, 2) a lower carbohydrate and higher fat diet, or 3) a walnut-rich, higher fat and lower carbohydrate diet. Those prescribed a walnut-rich diet consumed 1.5 ounces per day. Looking at data from the first six months of the intervention, this study found that the average weight loss was nearly eight percent of initial weight for all groups.

The walnut-rich diet participants saw comparable weight loss to the other study groups; however, they exhibited the most improvement in lipid levels, especially in those who are insulin-resistant. In addition to a significant decrease in LDL cholesterol, the walnut participants achieved a greater increase in HDL cholesterol as compared to the other diet groups.

Whereas the lower carbohydrate and higher fat diet participants were encouraged to consume foods higher in monounsaturated fats, the walnut-rich diet provided more polyunsaturated fats. Walnuts are the only nut in which the fat is primarily polyunsaturated fat (13g/oz), including a significant amount of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the plant-derived form of omega-3 fatty acids (2.5g/oz).

Recent research from Harvard also shows health benefits of consuming polyunsaturated fats. The study suggested that people who replace saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats may live longer and have a lower risk of heart disease. Additionally, the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines recommend consumption of polyunsaturated fats as a replacement for saturated fats.3

There are some study limitations that should be considered. The sample only included women, so these results may not be generalizable to men. Although 245 participants were enrolled, the sample sizes for comparisons were reduced because the participants were divided into subgroups. In addition, there is a lack of detailed information about dietary intake and adherence to the diets. Considering the weight loss that was seen in participants, it seems that most were adhering to a reduced calorie diet.

“In addition to these findings, we hope to explore the effect of walnuts on satiety, as we believe satiety is a critical factor for maintaining weight loss,” said Dr. Rock.

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1 in 10 Reaching for Takeout Menu on Mondays – Everyday Diabetes

1 in 10 Reaching for Takeout Menu on Mondays

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A new survey by DW Fitness Clubs showed that takeout food rapidly becoming a weekday fixture, rather than the once-in-a-while indulgence they used to be. Asking 2,000 UK residents which day were they most likely to eat a takeaway, the results highlighted that for many of us, any day goes.

While unsurprisingly the weekend came out on top, almost 1 in 10 are also reaching for the takeaway menu on a Monday, perhaps to perk themselves up after a long day back at work. The same amount of us also like to start the weekend early, switching off the oven and ordering on a Thursday.

With just under 2% of us claiming not to have a takeaway on a weekly basis, the results also highlighted that one gender is a little more partial to takeout than the other.

Across the board, men were more likely to order a takeaway on any given day with, for example, 10% of men likely to enjoy a takeaway on a Monday, compared to just 6% of women.

More convenient than they have ever been, platforms such as Just Eat and Hungry House ensure tempting takeout can be on the way in minutes and on any day of the week. Unfortunately, this level of ease could be contributing to our ever- expanding waistlines, with the detrimental health effects of takeout well-documented.  Loaded with high levels of fat, salt and sugar, it’s clear there is a price to pay for convenience.

Speaking on the effects of too many takeout meals, the research was discussed by Personal Trainer and Nutritionist, Carly Tierney of DW Fitness Clubs. “Fast food and takeout are often rumoured to cause a variety of health problems. Ingredients that are artificial, high in sugar or fat are not meant to be eaten on a regular basis.

“Fast food and takeout are often rumoured to cause a variety of health problems. Ingredients that are artificial, high in sugar or fat are not meant to be eaten on a regular basis.

“Being aware of these effects is essential to determining whether fast food is safe to include in your diet, particularly if you suffer from heart or digestive issues already.

“We’re only human, and it can often seem like the easier option to have a takeaway at the end of a long hard day, but I advise my clients to focus on meal prep to avoid temptation. It’s worth putting the time in to have a healthy dinner ready and waiting for you at home. Double up on what you’re making and you’ll have enough left over for the next night, or even freeze extra portions to take out and defrost in the morning when you know you’ve got a busy day ahead.”

As the cliché goes, a little of what you fancy does you good. But chances are that the nutritional benefits of your favorite takeout are few and far between.

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Delicious Delights: Try this Healthy Banana Matcha Cookies Recipe – Everyday Diabetes

Delicious Delights: Try this Healthy Banana Matcha Cookies Recipe

Matcha is considered to be the most nutritious green tea available, as it is packed with super healthy antioxidants and amino acids.

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If you don’t know what matcha is, well now you do – It’s a dark green powder made from the dried tea leaves of the Camellia Sinensis plant. It is considered to be the most nutritious green tea available, as it is packed with antioxidants and amino acids which can be very beneficial for your health. As well as drinking it as a tea, Matcha makes a great addition to both sweet and savory dishes. Try making my Banana Matcha Cookies, and enjoy a tasty, nutritious snack.

Matcha Powder

Pure Matcha powder has a dark green color and a deep aroma. It has a slightly sweet flavor which makes it the perfect addition to baking recipes and has the added benefit of delivering more antioxidants than spinach, broccoli, and wheatgrass.

It’s becoming more and more popular all over the world, as people are discovering the many ways that Matcha powder can boost your health. Studies show it can improve your skin’s condition making it smooth and supple, help your body get rid of toxins, aid with constipation and bloating issues, and stabilize your energy levels.

Spelt Flour

Spelt flour has a very similar nutritional profile to whole wheat flour, but it has fewer calories and a slightly higher protein content. It’s becoming a very popular cereal grain, as it can substitute wheat flour in many recipes such as pasta, bread, cakes and wheat-free dishes.

Although it does contain gluten, it is easier to digest than the gluten found in wheat flour, and also provides healthy nutrients such as magnesium, zinc, iron and Vitamin B3.

Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is a good substitute to vegetable oils and butter, and can be beneficial for your health. It is high in medium chain fatty acids which go straight to the liver once digested, and create a good source of energy.

It contains Vitamins E and K as well as antioxidants and lauric acid, and is said to aid with weight loss, reduce hunger pangs and fight belly fat. Make sure you choose organic, virgin coconut oil so it doesn’t suffer a nutrient loss during processing.  

Banana

Bananas are a healthy source of potassium, vitamins, and fiber. As with most fruits, they are high in carbohydrates, but they’re considered to have a lower Glycemic Index than other high-carb foods.

They also contain other bioactive compounds such as dopamine and catechin, which act as powerful antioxidants.   

Coconut Sugar

Coconut sugar can be used to substitute regular sugar, and many view it as a healthier choice as it contains some minerals and antioxidants. It’s made by collecting the sap from coconut palm trees, which is then placed under heat so that most of the water evaporates.

Some studies show it has a lower GI than sugar, but it does contain fructose so shouldn’t be consumed in high amounts.

Pink Himalayan Salt

You might be thinking that salt is just salt, right? But actually, pink Himalayan salt has a much higher mineral content than regular table salt, and is considered to have many nutritional and therapeutic properties.

It’s over 99% pure, and doesn’t contain foreign agents which are often used to keep salt white and stop it from clumping.

How to make them the cookies!

Ingredients (makes 10 cookies):

  • 2 tsp Matcha Powder
  • 1 ½ cup spelt flour
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 banana
  • 4 tbsp coconut sugar
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • A pinch of pink Himalayan salt

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 180ºC / 355 F, and line a baking sheet with greaseproof paper.

Sift the flour into a large bowl, and mix in all the other dry ingredients.

In a smaller bowl, mash the banana with a fork until it’s liquid.

Add the banana to the flour mixture, and then pour in the coconut oil. Beat the ingredients to create a dough, but don’t overmix as the gluten in spelt flour easily breaks down.

Once the dough feels springy, divide it out and roll into balls. If it feels too sticky to handle, you can add a little more flour.

Place the balls on the lined baking sheet, evenly spaced out, and then gently press down with a fork. If you prefer a more uniform finish, you can use a cookie cutter instead.

Place the tray in the oven and bake for 10 to 15 minutes. You can enjoy them once they’re cool, or keep them in an airtight container for later.

Louisa Rose is from Cologne, Germany. She runs www.BodyHealthLove.com, where she blogs about health and beauty advice for young women.

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Health Effects of Food Not According to it’s Nutrition Facts – Everyday Diabetes

Health Effects of Food Not According to it’s Nutrition Facts

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Traditionally investigations of a foodstuff’s implications for human health focus on the content of individual nutrients such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, etc. However, newer research shows that the health effects of a food product cannot be determined on the basis on the individual nutrients it contains. The food must be evaluated as a whole – together with other foods eaten at the same time. The findings of the expert panel have been published in the highly respected scientific journal the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

We consume foods and meals – not nutrients

Postdoc Tanja Kongerslev Thorning, Ph.D., from the Department of Nutrition, Exercise, and Sports at the University of Copenhagen, is the first author of the report. Tanja explains that scientists have long wondered why the actual effects of a food are at variance with the effects expected on the basis of its nutrition content. They have therefore started to look at things in a wider context:

“Researchers have become more skillful over the years, and we have acquired more methods for exploring what specific nutrients mean for digestion and health,” Tanja continues “But when we eat, we do not consume individual nutrients. We eat the whole food. Either alone or together with other foods in a meal. It, therefore, seems obvious that we should assess food products in context.”

Ultimately this means that the composition of a food can alter the properties of the nutrients contained within it, in ways that cannot be predicted on the basis of an analysis of the individual nutrients. For example, dairy products such as cheese have a lesser effect on blood cholesterol than would be predicted on the basis of their content of saturated fat. There are interactions between the nutrients in a food that are significant for its overall effect on health.

Tanja Kongerslev Thorning explains further “Another example is almonds, which contain a lot of fat, but which release less fat than expected during digestion. Even when chewed really well. The effects on health of a food item are probably a combination of the relationship between its nutrients, and also of the methods used in its preparation or production. This means that some foods may be better for us, or less healthy than is currently believed.”

Some of the precepts of current nutrition science need to be reconsidered

The expert panel behind these conclusions consists of 18 experts in epidemiology, food, nutrition and medical science. They were brought together for a workshop organized by the University of Copenhagen in collaboration with the University of Reading in September 2016. Discussions focussed on dairy products, and on how the complex mixture of nutrients and bioactive substances, such as minerals and vitamins, can affect digestion and ultimately change the overall nutritional and health properties of a particular food.

The panel concluded, among other things, that yoghurt and cheese have a different and more beneficial effect on bone health, body weight, the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases than would be expected on the basis of their saturated fat and calcium content.

Head of Department of Nutrition, Exercise, and Sports at the University of Copenhagen, professor Arne Astrup, who chaired the workshop, explains that the example of cheese is good to illustrate that a food’s health effects cannot be judged by single nutrients e.g. sodium and saturated fat:

“In contrast to current recommendations that essentially ban full-fat cheese, current research clearly demonstrate important health benefits of cheese for prevention of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancers. All the positive effects are due to a complex interaction between beneficial bacteria, minerals, and bioactive cheese ingredients.”

Professor of Food Chain Nutrition Ian Givens at the University of Reading, the co-chair of the meeting, concludes:

“More studies are needed, but ultimately it seems that some areas of nutrition science need to be rethought. We cannot focus on a nutrient without looking at how it is consumed and what else is eaten at the same time.”

The findings are published in the article Whole dairy matrix or single nutrients in assessment of health effects: current evidence and knowledge gaps in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Gluten-Free Diet May Increase Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Other Diseases Suggests Study – Everyday Diabetes

Gluten-Free Diet May Increase Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Other Diseases Suggests Study

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New research from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggests that avoiding gluten, a protein found in many grains, could actually increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases.

A 30-year observational analysis of nearly 200,000 people found that people who eat gluten develop type 2 diabetes less often than occasional consumers –as intake does not exceed 12 grams per day.

The research also shows gluten-phobes tend to eat less cereal fiber, a type of fiber found in bran, barley, and other whole grains that’s known to guard against type 2 diabetes.

While those with Celiac disease or diagnosed gluten sensitivity should continue to abstain, Harvard’s Geng Zong says those who eat gluten-free foods as a lifestyle choice may want to reconsider.

“Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more,” Zong says. “People without Celiac disease may reconsider limiting their gluten intake for chronic disease prevention, especially for diabetes.”

Consult your healthcare provider for what is best for you.

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Diabetes 101 – EveryDay Diabetes Magazine

DIABETES 101

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes and you’re on the road to understanding what it all means, your journey starts here.
Here you will find helpful information about diabetes, the lifestyle changes, what you can eat, how you should take care of yourself and more.
A place you can start to make changes in your life for the better.
The Basics About Diabetes - Everyday Diabetes Magazine

The Basics

Diagnosed with diabetes and not sure what it’s all about? Here are the basics to get started. (read more)

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. (read more)

Type 2 Diabetes

Usually discovered in adulthood, it is found increasingly more in young people. (read more)

What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A person’s fasting blood glucose can be measured, or they can take an oral glucose tolerance test determine if they have pre-diabetes. You can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes by keeping to a exercise and diet strategy designed to reduce excess pounds.

Diabetes 101 – EveryDay Diabetes Magazine

DIABETES 101

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes and you’re on the road to understanding what it all means, your journey starts here.
Here you will find helpful information about diabetes, the lifestyle changes, what you can eat, how you should take care of yourself and more.
A place you can start to make changes in your life for the better.
The Basics About Diabetes - Everyday Diabetes Magazine

The Basics

Diagnosed with diabetes and not sure what it’s all about? Here are the basics to get started. (read more)

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. (read more)

Type 2 Diabetes

Usually discovered in adulthood, it is found increasingly more in young people. (read more)

What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A person’s fasting blood glucose can be measured, or they can take an oral glucose tolerance test determine if they have pre-diabetes. You can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes by keeping to a exercise and diet strategy designed to reduce excess pounds.

The Decadent Diabetic: Grunt Work and Diabetes – Nothing Comes Easy – Everyday Diabetes

The Decadent Diabetic: Grunt Work and Diabetes – Nothing Comes Easy

Grunt work has been a part of our cooking forever. In the days before preprocessed foods, doing it from scratch was the only choice.

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I eat deliciously and still really manage my Diabetes. Sometimes it takes a lot of chopping and advance work….also called “grunt work.” In a professional kitchen much of this is done by the prep cook. In my (home) Diabetes-Compatible kitchen it is all done by me. It is well worth the energy.

I always think it a great evening when I can actually watch the craziness on the evening news while my dinner is cooking in the oven. I think of it as a mini vacation from all that last minute prep and stir. But before it got to the oven, there was work to be done.

I won’t lie to you, sometimes Diabetes-Compatible cooking takes more work than the way I cooked before. I have grown to really enjoy cauliflower and spaghetti squash. There is no question that it takes a lot more time and work to make mashed cauliflower rather than smashed spuds.

Please don’t get me wrong. I have no difficulty using some pre-made products…I found several chains that make great products and I don’t have to do the work.

Spaghetti squash takes longer and again more effort than opening a box of pasta and tossing it into a pot of boiling water. The results are different than the original products (potatoes and pasta) but the flavors are often even better. Good flavors, more nutrients, and lower carbohydrates isn’t that worth the work?

Grunt work has been a part of our cooking forever. In the days before preprocessed foods, doing it from scratch was the only choice. Many of us today are shying away from the pre-done idea of packaged foods and making meals with less additives AND more flavors that we like to eat.

Think pot roast, beef or chicken stews and so many of the “homey” foods we love eating. All those wonderful long-cooking dishes have been part of our lives for as long as we can remember.

Step one is to seal in the flavors by searing on all sides. A good holiday turkey takes a long time and a lot of basting not to mention preparations for the stuffing/dressings and the countless sides. What would Thanksgiving be without it?

Think of the modern day “slow cooker”. Sure you set the dial and go off to play shuffleboard, but before you set the timer you have been chopping and mixing to get the flavors and textures into your dish.

I often write about a paté being little more than a fancy meatloaf. It is true, but how plain is a meatloaf? It takes chopping and mixing, and forming. The end result is pure comfort food.and the best sandwiches the next day.

Now if you have never been interested in making a meatloaf or stew or turkey, all the extra work that some meals take to get on your table will be of little interest to you.

But if you have been doing these kinds of meals for years, the extra effort to make them work for your Diabetes meals really won’t be that much trouble. I don’t suggest you re-invent the wheel, simply make the wheel a tool in moving the good management of your Diabetes along more smoothly.

Dozens of my recipes suggest (it is always your choice) to prepare parts of it in advance. It not only makes the final preparation easier and quicker, but adds flavor depth to the dish. Think about why you marinate meat or chicken.

Recipes suggest doing this so that the protein absorbs more flavors and becomes more tender. If you don’t believe me, try cooking two steaks using the same seasonings. Marinate one of them and prepare the other just before cooking. I think the difference is enormous. The other thing is if you marinate the steak a day ahead, the amount of time you have to work at the end is a lot shorter.

Please don’t get me wrong. I have no difficulty using some pre-made products. I do not make my own sausage. I found several chains that make great products and I don’t have to do the work. Then there is frozen spinach. I would be lost without it. It still tastes good, has all the nutritional value, and I don’t have to cook it before using it in a recipe.

As for the extra work making meals or even just side dishes that fit better in a lower carbohydrate eating plan.. aren’t you worth the time and….no trouble at all?

Enjoy, be happy, be Healthy, BE DECADENT.-w!

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Compound Found in Chili and Marijuana: Study Says it Can Reduce Stomach Inflammation in Diabetics – Everyday Diabetes

Compound Found in Chili and Marijuana: Study Says it Can Reduce Stomach Inflammation in Diabetics

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Who knew that eating chili can possibly help in reducing gut inflammation in type 1 diabetes? A compound called capsaicin, which is also found in marijuana, leads to anandamide production which interacts with the receptor to proliferate and help reduce inflammation.

“Our study unveils a role for the endocannabinoid system in maintaining immune homeostasis in the gut/pancreas and reveals a conversation between the nervous and immune systems using distinct receptors,” said study co-author Pramod Srivastava to Diabetes.co.uk.

Scienceworldreport.com reports:

The study suggests that edible marijuana could lessen the gut inflammation and provides insights on the association of the brain, gut and the immune system. The results in rats show that both capsaicin and anandamide lessened the gut inflammation. Likewise, the compound in chili pepper reversed type 1 diabetes in the mice.

Read more here.

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About Us – Everyday Diabetes

About Us

Welcome!

EveryDay Diabetes is an online digital information news source for people with diabetes to provide them with the necessary tools, clarity and confidence to win at work, succeed in life and reach their potential.

Our goal is simple – to provide reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.

Our digital magazine, EveryDay Diabetes, offers up-to-date news, practical information on food & drink, body & mind, gadgets & tech, lifestyle & leisure, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.

On this website, you’ll find a variety of tips, knowledge, and insights about diabetes self-care written by health-care professionals and people with diabetes, as well as reports about late-breaking diabetes news. You can also sign up for our free newsletter and receive the latest diabetes news delivered straight to your inbox.

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Publisher: Michael Conforme
publisher@everydaydiabetes.com
Editor in Chief: Bobby McGill
editor@everydaydiabetes.com
Partnerships & Marketing: Emma Kim
partners@everydaydiabetes.com 
Copy Editor: Michael Reese
Contributing Writers:

About Us – Everyday Diabetes

About Us

Welcome!

EveryDay Diabetes is an online digital information news source for people with diabetes to provide them with the necessary tools, clarity and confidence to win at work, succeed in life and reach their potential.

Our goal is simple – to provide reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.

Our digital magazine, EveryDay Diabetes, offers up-to-date news, practical information on food & drink, body & mind, gadgets & tech, lifestyle & leisure, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.

On this website, you’ll find a variety of tips, knowledge, and insights about diabetes self-care written by health-care professionals and people with diabetes, as well as reports about late-breaking diabetes news. You can also sign up for our free newsletter and receive the latest diabetes news delivered straight to your inbox.

Contact us

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Your Message

Everyday Diabetes Staff

Publisher: Michael Conforme
publisher@everydaydiabetes.com
Editor in Chief: Bobby McGill
editor@everydaydiabetes.com
Partnerships & Marketing: Emma Kim
partners@everydaydiabetes.com 
Copy Editor: Michael Reese
Contributing Writers: