Category Archives: body mind

Pole Dancing in Water – Latest Fitness Craze – Everyday Diabetes

Pole Dancing in Water – Latest Fitness Craze

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Pole dancing was brought back as a fitness routine – but lo and behold, for those water babies out there who prefer to be submerged, AquaPole gives you so much more.

Pole dancing whilst submerged in water began in Italy, where AquaPole trainers from South Australia traveled to learn the tricks of the trade and bring it  back to Australia.

Dailymail.co.uk reports:

AquaPole is a fun new fitness craze that sees people using a pole as a fitness tool in the water to strengthen their core and muscles. The pole is 2.2 metres in height and is hooked into a base which is suctioned to the pool floor with suction cups. It provides stability in the water to hold on to and use as a fitness tool.

‘Adding that extra dimension to exercise brings new life for the younger generation because up until a few ago, water exercises such as water aerobics were considered, you know, grannies’ activities,’ Jodie explained to DailyMail.

Read more here.

 

 

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Napercise, anyone? – Everyday Diabetes

Napercise, anyone?

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It’s no joke. Napping is now a form of exercise. A U.K.-based fitness chain is about to make that daydream a reality with “napercise,” a group class in which participants quite literally nap for 45 minutes.

Imagine having beds instead of stationary bikes. Participants of the class will find single beds, “atmospheric” sounds and a temperature which promotes calorie burning during sleep. The class will take place in the mid-afternoon.

Health.com reports:

While the concept may seem silly, the motivation for the class is no joke. The idea came about after a David Lloyds Clubs survey found that 86% of parents struggle with fatigue, and 26% generally get less than five hours of sleep a night.

Read more here.

 

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The Low Down on Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes – Everyday Diabetes

The Low Down on Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

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You’re probably spending hours working out if you have type 2 diabetes. And why won’t you? Getting your weight down and sweating it out have numerous benefits, and it’s also the first thing your doctor advise you to do – lose weight.

But did you know that just a five to ten percent reduction from your starting weight can have significant effects on blood glucose levels? So slow down a bit and be aware of how much exercise do you really need. You’d be surprised to know that you’re probably doing too much.

Rd.com reports:

Exercise will not only help control blood sugar levels but also help you shed weight and keep your heart healthy. It’s important you keep an eye on your blood sugar because any physical activity makes you more sensitive to insulin.

Endocrinologists suggest type 2 diabetics get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity exercises like brisk walking or an equivalent. Flexibility and strength training are also encouraged. If doing 30 minutes in one session sounds daunting, no worries. You can spread it out over the course of the day.

Read more here.

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The Surprising Benefit of Light Physical Activity – Everyday Diabetes

The Surprising Benefit of Light Physical Activity

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You don’t have to spend hours at the gym or work up a dripping sweat to improve your mood and feel better about yourself, researchers at the University of Connecticut say in a new study.

If you lead a sedentary lifestyle — spending large parts of your day sitting at home or at work – simply getting out of your chair and moving around can reduce depression and lift your spirits.

“We hope this research helps people realize the important public health message that simply going from doing no physical activity to performing some physical activity can improve their subjective well-being,” says Gregory Panza, a graduate student in UConn’s Department of Kinesiology and the study’s lead author.

“What is, even more, promising for the physically inactive person is that they do not need to exercise vigorously to see these improvements,” Panza continues. “Instead, our results indicate you will get the best ‘bang for your buck’ with light or moderate intensity physical activity.”

For those keeping score, light physical activity is the equivalent of taking a leisurely walk around the mall with no noticeable increase in breathing, heart rate, or sweating, says Distinguished Kinesiology Professor Linda Pescatello, senior researcher on the project. Moderate intensity activity is equivalent to walking a 15-20-minute mile with an increase in breathing, heart rate, and sweating, yet still being able to carry on a conversation. Vigorous activity is equivalent to a very brisk walk or jogging a 13-minute mile with a very noticeable increase in breathing, heart rate, and sweating to the point of being unable to maintain a conversation.

The study looked at 419 generally healthy middle-aged adults who wore accelerometers on their hips to track physical activity over four days. Participants also completed a series of questionnaires asking them to describe their daily exercise habits, psychological well-being, depression level, pain severity, and the extent to which pain interfered with their daily activities.

Here’s what the researchers learned:

  • People who reported higher levels of sedentary behavior also reported lower levels of subjective well-being, meaning those who sat around a lot were the least happiest. Subjective well-being is defined as the positive and negative evaluations that people make of their own lives. These results confirmed previous studies.
  • In general, physical activity improved people’s sense of well-being. Yet, different intensities of physical activity were more beneficial to some people than others. For instance, people who participated in light-intensity physical activity reported higher levels of psychological well-being and lower levels of depression. People who participated in moderate-intensity physical activity reported higher levels of psychological well-being and lower levels of pain severity.
  • People who led sedentary lives and engaged in light or moderate physical activity showed the greatest improvement in overall sense of well-being. “The ‘more is better’ mindset may not be true when it comes to physical activity intensity and subjective well-being,” says Panza. “In fact, an ‘anything is better’ attitude may be more appropriate if your goal is a higher level of subjective well-being.”
  • While light and moderate physical activity clearly made some people feel better about themselves, when it came to vigorous activity, the results were neutral. There was no positive or negative association found between high-intensity physical activity and subjective well-being.

The last finding is actually good news for folks who enjoy hard, calorie-burning workouts, as it doesn’t support a widely reported recent study that found high-intensity workouts significantly lowered some people’s sense of well-being.

“Recent studies had suggested a slightly unsettling link between vigorous activity and subjective well-being,” says Beth Taylor, associate professor of kinesiology and another member of the research team. “We did not find this in the current study, which is reassuring to individuals who enjoy a vigorous activity and may be worried about negative effects.”

Many previous studies have attempted to identify the best exercise regimen to improve people’s sense of well-being. Yet no clear consensus has emerged. Some studies say moderate or vigorous activity is best. Others say low-intensity exercise is better. The differences, the UConn researchers say, may be due to the way the studies were designed and possible limitations in how people’s well-being and levels of physical activity were measured.

The UConn study is believed to be the first of its kind to use both objective (accelerometers) and subjective (questionnaires) measurements within a single group to examine the relationship between physical activity intensity and well-being.

Yet the UConn research also has its limits, Panza says.

All of the individuals who participated in the UConn study had a generally positive sense of well-being going into the project and were generally physically active. So their answers in the questionnaires need to be framed in that context. Whether the same results would hold true for people with lower subjective well-being or lower levels of physical activity is unknown, Panza says.

Also, the conclusions formed in the UConn study are based on information gathered at a single point in time. A longitudinal study that tracks people’s feelings and physical activity over time would go a long way toward helping determine what exercise regimen might be best for different populations, Panza said.

“If it doesn’t make us feel good, we don’t want to do it,” says Taylor. “Establishing the link between different types, doses, and intensities of physical activity on well-being is a very important step in encouraging more people to exercise.”

The study was published in the Journal of Health Psychology in February.

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The Surprising Benefit of Light Physical Activity – Everyday Diabetes

The Surprising Benefit of Light Physical Activity

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You don’t have to spend hours at the gym or work up a dripping sweat to improve your mood and feel better about yourself, researchers at the University of Connecticut say in a new study.

If you lead a sedentary lifestyle — spending large parts of your day sitting at home or at work – simply getting out of your chair and moving around can reduce depression and lift your spirits.

“We hope this research helps people realize the important public health message that simply going from doing no physical activity to performing some physical activity can improve their subjective well-being,” says Gregory Panza, a graduate student in UConn’s Department of Kinesiology and the study’s lead author.

“What is, even more, promising for the physically inactive person is that they do not need to exercise vigorously to see these improvements,” Panza continues. “Instead, our results indicate you will get the best ‘bang for your buck’ with light or moderate intensity physical activity.”

For those keeping score, light physical activity is the equivalent of taking a leisurely walk around the mall with no noticeable increase in breathing, heart rate, or sweating, says Distinguished Kinesiology Professor Linda Pescatello, senior researcher on the project. Moderate intensity activity is equivalent to walking a 15-20-minute mile with an increase in breathing, heart rate, and sweating, yet still being able to carry on a conversation. Vigorous activity is equivalent to a very brisk walk or jogging a 13-minute mile with a very noticeable increase in breathing, heart rate, and sweating to the point of being unable to maintain a conversation.

The study looked at 419 generally healthy middle-aged adults who wore accelerometers on their hips to track physical activity over four days. Participants also completed a series of questionnaires asking them to describe their daily exercise habits, psychological well-being, depression level, pain severity, and the extent to which pain interfered with their daily activities.

Here’s what the researchers learned:

  • People who reported higher levels of sedentary behavior also reported lower levels of subjective well-being, meaning those who sat around a lot were the least happiest. Subjective well-being is defined as the positive and negative evaluations that people make of their own lives. These results confirmed previous studies.
  • In general, physical activity improved people’s sense of well-being. Yet, different intensities of physical activity were more beneficial to some people than others. For instance, people who participated in light-intensity physical activity reported higher levels of psychological well-being and lower levels of depression. People who participated in moderate-intensity physical activity reported higher levels of psychological well-being and lower levels of pain severity.
  • People who led sedentary lives and engaged in light or moderate physical activity showed the greatest improvement in overall sense of well-being. “The ‘more is better’ mindset may not be true when it comes to physical activity intensity and subjective well-being,” says Panza. “In fact, an ‘anything is better’ attitude may be more appropriate if your goal is a higher level of subjective well-being.”
  • While light and moderate physical activity clearly made some people feel better about themselves, when it came to vigorous activity, the results were neutral. There was no positive or negative association found between high-intensity physical activity and subjective well-being.

The last finding is actually good news for folks who enjoy hard, calorie-burning workouts, as it doesn’t support a widely reported recent study that found high-intensity workouts significantly lowered some people’s sense of well-being.

“Recent studies had suggested a slightly unsettling link between vigorous activity and subjective well-being,” says Beth Taylor, associate professor of kinesiology and another member of the research team. “We did not find this in the current study, which is reassuring to individuals who enjoy a vigorous activity and may be worried about negative effects.”

Many previous studies have attempted to identify the best exercise regimen to improve people’s sense of well-being. Yet no clear consensus has emerged. Some studies say moderate or vigorous activity is best. Others say low-intensity exercise is better. The differences, the UConn researchers say, may be due to the way the studies were designed and possible limitations in how people’s well-being and levels of physical activity were measured.

The UConn study is believed to be the first of its kind to use both objective (accelerometers) and subjective (questionnaires) measurements within a single group to examine the relationship between physical activity intensity and well-being.

Yet the UConn research also has its limits, Panza says.

All of the individuals who participated in the UConn study had a generally positive sense of well-being going into the project and were generally physically active. So their answers in the questionnaires need to be framed in that context. Whether the same results would hold true for people with lower subjective well-being or lower levels of physical activity is unknown, Panza says.

Also, the conclusions formed in the UConn study are based on information gathered at a single point in time. A longitudinal study that tracks people’s feelings and physical activity over time would go a long way toward helping determine what exercise regimen might be best for different populations, Panza said.

“If it doesn’t make us feel good, we don’t want to do it,” says Taylor. “Establishing the link between different types, doses, and intensities of physical activity on well-being is a very important step in encouraging more people to exercise.”

The study was published in the Journal of Health Psychology in February.

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Exercise Benefits in a Pill For Those Who Cannot Move – Almost a Reality – Everyday Diabetes

Exercise Benefits in a Pill For Those Who Cannot Move – Almost a Reality

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If you have long dreamed of reaping the rewards of exercise, but unfortunately, you are not able to move let alone stand, worry no more. Scientists are starting to make this dream a reality.

Hopes for such a pill emerged on Tuesday from scientists who found that an experimental drug allowed mice to run on a treadmill for 270 minutes before exhaustion set in. They turned to a drug known as GW501516 which had previously been shown to improve stamina and burn fat faster.

ScienceDaily reports:

In the current study, the Salk team gave normal mice a higher dose of GW, for a longer period of time (8 weeks instead of 4). Mice in the control group could run about 160 minutes before exhaustion. Mice on the drug, however, could run about 270 minutes — about 70 percent longer.

Read more here.

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Five Tips for Diabetic Footcare to Keep your Feet Happy and Healthy – Everyday Diabetes

Five Tips for Diabetic Footcare to Keep your Feet Happy and Healthy

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The folks over at 3M have put together a helpful set of tips on how you can take care of your feet when you have diabetes.

Diabetes is an important condition to manage, but it doesn’t have to dominate the lives of those it affects. Diabetes is especially hard on your feet and legs, but a combination of new habits and modern technology can help you stay on your feet.

Check feet every day

The first step of any process is being well-informed, and it’s no different with foot care. Because numbness is a common symptom of diabetes, sores can develop without you feeling them. So, it’s essential that you regularly check your legs and feet for any sores or cracks in the skin, so you can start treating them early.

Keep your feet clean

Wash every day with a gentle cleanser and dry them thoroughly, with special attention to the area between your toes, to minimize the presence of irritants and the chances of infection.

Moisturize

Your feet can lose their natural moisture, causing them to dry and crack. To keep your feet healthy and comfortable, apply a moisturizer every day. Avoid the areas between your toes.

Wear comfortable, supportive shoes

A soft shoe that fits snugly but not tightly can make a world of difference. A shoe that’s the wrong size can create excess pressure or friction, resulting in blisters or ulcers. There are also specialized shoes available that provide additional support, ranging from soft, shock-absorbing materials to fully customized doctor-prescribed footwear.

Work proactively with your doctor

There’s a lot you can do on your own, but doctors have the experience and expertise to identify and address minor issues before they become major. Come to your doctor with any questions or if any new symptoms arise, like sores or numbness, or if you sustain any unrelated foot injury, like an ingrown toenail.

Diabetes presents many obstacles, but with the right habits, tools, and support, we can take steps to overcome them.

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Diabetes 101 – EveryDay Diabetes Magazine

DIABETES 101

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes and you’re on the road to understanding what it all means, your journey starts here.
Here you will find helpful information about diabetes, the lifestyle changes, what you can eat, how you should take care of yourself and more.
A place you can start to make changes in your life for the better.
The Basics About Diabetes - Everyday Diabetes Magazine

The Basics

Diagnosed with diabetes and not sure what it’s all about? Here are the basics to get started. (read more)

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. (read more)

Type 2 Diabetes

Usually discovered in adulthood, it is found increasingly more in young people. (read more)

What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A person’s fasting blood glucose can be measured, or they can take an oral glucose tolerance test determine if they have pre-diabetes. You can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes by keeping to a exercise and diet strategy designed to reduce excess pounds.

Diabetes 101 – EveryDay Diabetes Magazine

DIABETES 101

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes and you’re on the road to understanding what it all means, your journey starts here.
Here you will find helpful information about diabetes, the lifestyle changes, what you can eat, how you should take care of yourself and more.
A place you can start to make changes in your life for the better.
The Basics About Diabetes - Everyday Diabetes Magazine

The Basics

Diagnosed with diabetes and not sure what it’s all about? Here are the basics to get started. (read more)

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. (read more)

Type 2 Diabetes

Usually discovered in adulthood, it is found increasingly more in young people. (read more)

What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A person’s fasting blood glucose can be measured, or they can take an oral glucose tolerance test determine if they have pre-diabetes. You can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes by keeping to a exercise and diet strategy designed to reduce excess pounds.

Diabetes Late Nite Podcast with Mr. Divabetic – Ella Fitzgerald – Everyday Diabetes

Diabetes Late Nite Podcast with Mr. Divabetic – Ella Fitzgerald

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Tonight, we’re celebrating National Diabetes Awareness month with music from our favorite jazz legend “divabetic”, Ella Fitzgerald. Also known as “First Lady of Song” and “Lady Ella”, captured audiences everywhere with her astonishing vocal range, scat singing, and improvisational ability.

“I never knew how good our songs were,” Ira Gershwin once said, “until I heard Ella Fitzgerald sing them.”

Over the decades, Miss Fitzgerald performed with big bands, symphony orchestras and small jazz groups. Her repertory encompassed show tunes, jazz songs, novelties (l “A-Tisket A-Tasket,”), bossa nova, and even opera (“Porgy and Bess”).

From the early 1970’s, Miss Fitzgerald began to have eyesight problems complicated by diabetes, and in 1986 she had heart surgery, but she returned to the concert stage the next year.

Unfortunately she had to have both legs amputated below the knee. Despite ill health, she continued to perform at least once month into the early 1990’s. Although her quality of voice slowly deteriorated from the early 1970’s, even at the end of her career, her singing retained a remarkable rhythmic acuity.

Diabetes Late Nite guests include the Charlie’s Angels of Outreach (Patricia Addie-Gentle RN, CDE, Susan Weiner MS, RDN, CDE, CDN) Poet Lorraine Brooks, Ansley Dalbo, Best-Selling Author Anna J. Stewart, Leola and Cornelia,and Mama Rose Marie.

Throughout the podcast we will be playing songs from Columbia Jazz: Ella Fitzgerald’s Live album courtesy of SONY Music.

Diabetes Late Nite is a fast-paced, full-filled hour of diabetes education and wellness advice that encourages listeners to “laugh a little, learn a lot.”


 About Mr. Divabetic

Mr. Divabetic Diabetes PodcastHosted by the happiest health care “MC,” Max “Mr. Divabetic” Szadek, DivaTalkRadio will change attitudes, boost spirits, encourage hope and motivate others to stay healthy with a feather boa, a smile and fabulous sense of style! DivaTalkRadio is the epicenter of the circle of care, a link between patients and their health care providers, a translator of clinical speak and a bridge between denial and acceptance, fear and confidence. Divabetic was inspired by the late music legend, Luther Vandross and created in 2005 by Max Szadek, who, as Vandross’ assistant of 14 years, witnessed his boss, mentor, and friend struggle in silence and solitude with the diabetes and its related complications.

President Barak Obama, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter have acknowledged Divabetic for its dedication and determination on behalf of the diabetes community. Through education, support and a Glam More, Fear Less philosophy, Divabetic encourages a predominately-female entourage to become wellness and health ambassadors to their families and their communities. Visit Divabetic on the web: www.divabetic.org.

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Diabetes Late Nite Podcast: Inspired by Gladys Knight & The Pips – Everyday Diabetes

Diabetes Late Nite Podcast: Inspired by Gladys Knight & The Pips

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Mr. Divabetic talks about nighttime diabetes management with musical inspiration from Gladys Knight & The Pips courtesy of SONY Music.

Gladys Knight doesn’t have diabetes, but the disease is as close to her heart as the memories of her mother, Elizabeth Knight, who died of complications from the disease in 1997. A five-time Grammy award winner, Knight is as busy as ever gracing the entertainment world with her exceptional voice. Yet she never misses an opportunity to voice the message of early detection and treatment of diabetes.

Gladys shares her final words of wisdom: ” Do something about diabetes … Know more, do more!” Knight feels nearly as passionate about spreading that message as she does about the incredible singing career her mom helped her launch some 54 years ago.

Guests include Stacey Harris aka ‘The Diabetic Pastry Chef’, Mary Ann Hodorowicz, RD, LDN, MBA, CDE, CEC,  the Charlie’s Angels of Outreach, SleepyHead Central founder Tamara Sellman RPSGT, CCSH, Poet Lorraine Brooks and Mama Rose Marie.

Diabetes Late Nite is a fast-paced, full-filled hour of diabetes education and wellness advice that encourages listeners to “laugh a little, learn a lot.”


 About Mr. Divabetic

Mr. Divabetic Diabetes PodcastHosted by the happiest health care “MC,” Max “Mr. Divabetic” Szadek, DivaTalkRadio will change attitudes, boost spirits, encourage hope and motivate others to stay healthy with a feather boa, a smile and fabulous sense of style! DivaTalkRadio is the epicenter of the circle of care, a link between patients and their health care providers, a translator of clinical speak and a bridge between denial and acceptance, fear and confidence. Divabetic was inspired by the late music legend, Luther Vandross and created in 2005 by Max Szadek, who, as Vandross’ assistant of 14 years, witnessed his boss, mentor, and friend struggle in silence and solitude with the diabetes and its related complications.

President Barak Obama, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter have acknowledged Divabetic for its dedication and determination on behalf of the diabetes community. Through education, support and a Glam More, Fear Less philosophy, Divabetic encourages a predominately-female entourage to become wellness and health ambassadors to their families and their communities.


Visit Divabetic on the web: www.divabetic.org.

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Diabetes Late Nite Podcast: Inspired by Della Reese – Everyday Diabetes

Diabetes Late Nite Podcast: Inspired by Della Reese

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Mr. Divabetic talks about embracing people with diabetes heath-related complications with musical inspiration from Della Reese.

According to Radar Online, Della Reese has had serious complications from type-2 diabetes. The famed gospel and jazz singer has even admitted the bouts she’s faced with diabetes have been life-threatening. “My life is at stake,” she said. “I don’t have type 2 diabetes – type 2 diabetes has me.”

In 2000, Della was officially diagnosed with diabetes after collapsing on the set of the hit TV show “Touched By An Angel”. Since then, she’s battled with her health to fight against wheelchair confinement. Her rep claims she’s still able to walk and refuses to be confined. At this point, let’s just hope she continues to fight like we know she can.

Guests include Diabetes Diabetes Alert Dog Trainer and Author from Chilbrook Kennels, Debby Kay, Central Farm Markets Co-Founder, Debra Moser, Master Hairstylist Karline Ricketts, the Charlie’s Angels of Outreach, Poet Lorraine Brooks and Mama Rose Marie.

Throughout the podcast we will be featuring selected songs from Della Reese’s albums courtesy of SONY Music.

Diabetes Late Nite is a fast-paced, full-filled hour of diabetes education and wellness advice that encourages listeners to “laugh a little, learn a lot.”

Diabetes Late Nite is a fast-paced, full-filled hour of diabetes education and wellness advice that encourages listeners to “laugh a little, learn a lot.”


 About Mr. Divabetic

Mr. Divabetic Diabetes PodcastHosted by the happiest health care “MC,” Max “Mr. Divabetic” Szadek, DivaTalkRadio will change attitudes, boost spirits, encourage hope and motivate others to stay healthy with a feather boa, a smile and fabulous sense of style! DivaTalkRadio is the epicenter of the circle of care, a link between patients and their health care providers, a translator of clinical speak and a bridge between denial and acceptance, fear and confidence. Divabetic was inspired by the late music legend, Luther Vandross and created in 2005 by Max Szadek, who, as Vandross’ assistant of 14 years, witnessed his boss, mentor, and friend struggle in silence and solitude with the diabetes and its related complications.

President Barak Obama, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter have acknowledged Divabetic for its dedication and determination on behalf of the diabetes community. Through education, support and a Glam More, Fear Less philosophy, Divabetic encourages a predominately-female entourage to become wellness and health ambassadors to their families and their communities.


Visit Divabetic on the web: www.divabetic.org.

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Contact Lens to Monitor Blood Glucose Levels Being Developed – Everyday Diabetes

Contact Lens to Monitor Blood Glucose Levels Being Developed

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Interesting news for diabetics: Researchers at Oregon State University are developing a contact lens that would use people’s tears to monitor their blood glucose levels.

“I have a friend who has diabetes, and saw the issues he faces managing his sugar levels,” Gregory Herman, leader of the Oregon State University research team, told The Independent.

A research team led by Oregon State professor Gregory Herman has developed a transparent biosensor that, when placed in a contact lens, could also be used to detect symptoms an array of health conditions.

According to the report in Gizmodo

Currently, a lab-tested prototype can only detect blood glucose levels, but in the future, the team believes it could detect other medical conditions, possibly even cancer. It’ll be a few years before we see such futuristic contact lenses on pharmacy shelves, but the technologies required to build this noninvasive diagnostic device largely exists today. This research will be presented today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Read more here.

 

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Get in touch with us

Contact us

Customer feedback is the lifeblood of our business. Tell us what’s on your mind, good or bad, we are always happy to get your input.

We respond to all customer feedback and look forward to hearing from you!

Want to write for us? Know a good story we should feature? Great! We’d love to hear about it. Drop us a line.

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Beer Yoga: The Latest Exercise Craze from Germany – Everyday Diabetes

Beer Yoga: The Latest Exercise Craze from Germany

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No wonder Oktoberfest and Bieryoga come from Germany, their love for beer is so uncanny that they create amazing things from it. Emily and Jhula are the masterminds behind ‘beer yoga’, a German craze that allows fitness fanatics to carry out traditional yoga poses while taking sips of booze.

Participants in these sessions, which usually last an hour, can take sips of the alcohol in between but are advised to limit their drinking to just one or two bottles.

Dailymail reports:

The movement, called ‘Bieryoga’, started in Berlin in 2015 and has spread to cities like Melbourne and Sydney. Despite gushing that they are ‘passionate about beer’, Emily and Jhula insisted the craze was not all fun and games. 

‘Beer Yoga is fun but it’s no joke – we take the philosophies of yoga and pair it with the pleasure of beer-drinking to reach your highest level of consciousness,’ the Bieryoga official site reads, says Dailymail.

Read more here.

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Ask Dr. Sally: ‘Can I Become Overweight from Healthy Food?’ – Everyday Diabetes

Ask Dr. Sally: ‘Can I Become Overweight from Healthy Food?’

Dr. Sally Norton is an NHS weight loss consultant and founder of www.vavistalife.com. She’s happy to answer questions you might have about healthy living.

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Dr. Sally Norton - Everyday Diabetes Magazine
Dr. Sally Norton

Q:

“I’m proud of the fact that I don’t eat junk food and stick with healthy foods. But my friend said that I can still put on weight eating “healthy” foods. Is that true?”

A:

Eating healthily is always a good thing: the benefits go beyond weight.  But there are other considerations that you need to take into account if you want to lose weight long term by eating healthily.  

Consider the following:

Good foods need to come in good portions.   For example, nuts are full of vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats. However, the key is sticking to a handful! Nuts are high in calories – and are very moreish…so before you know it you can consume a quarter of your recommended calories for the day. Same goes for dried fruit; a handful constitutes one of your 5-a-day, but get carried away and the calories soon tot up. Beans, whole grains, yogurt, fruit, olive oil – all carry loads of health benefits but check you aren’t eating them to excess.

 Good foods should be as unadulterated as possible.  Scan the shelves of a health food shop and you will find bags of dried fruit that have more sugar added. As if the natural, concentrated sugar within the dried fruit needs adding to. A big bowl of delicious salad or veg can more than quadruple its calorie count from the added dressing. Sometimes with extra salt and sugar too and don’t forget smoothies with more sugar than a can of coke. Not quite so healthy now.

 We are being duped. Clever manufacturers know that healthy food is a market winner. We are often happy to pay more if we think that a food is good for us. Problem is, unless we look carefully at the small print, we may simply be persuaded to buy when we spot a label that says natural sugars, healthy, organic, whole grain and the like. Yes, it may tick some ‘good’ boxes – but wholegrain muesli bars full of fat and sugar may do us more harm than good. And low-fat, which for years we associated with dieting, may simply mean chock-full of sugar or other agents that improve taste, but add calories.

We may eat more if we feel virtuous:

How many of us feel that we were so good in choosing the salad for main that we deserve the dessert after? Or that in resisting the chocolate bar in favor of the fruit flapjack, we are allowed an extra snack later? It is very easy to fool ourselves that we are eating so healthily that we can indulge more as a result. It’s well recognized – diners told that they are eating healthy food tend to consume larger portions than those who are given the same food but without that information.

 


Dr. Sally Norton is happy to answer questions you might have about health and diet. Send your question to editor@everydaydiabetes.com

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Apple Reportedly At Work on ‘Super Secret’ Tech for Diabetics – Everyday Diabetes

Apple Reportedly At Work on ‘Super Secret’ Tech for Diabetics

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CNBC is reporting that tech giant Apple has hired a small team of biomedical engineers and put them to work in a “nondescript office in Palo Alto”, as part of a super secret initiative, initially envisioned by the late Apple co-founder Steve Job.

The plan is to develop sensors that can continuously monitor blood sugar levels to better treat diabetes.

According to CNBC:

Such a breakthrough would be a “holy grail” for life sciences. Many life sciences companies have tried and failed, as it’s highly challenging to track glucose levels accurately without piercing the skin.

The initiative is far enough along that Apple has been conducting feasibility trials at clinical sites across the Bay Area and has hired consultants to help it figure out the regulatory pathways, the people said.

The efforts have been going on for at least five years, the people said. Jobs envisioned wearable devices, like smartwatches, being used to monitor important vitals, such as oxygen levels, heart rate and blood glucose. In 2010, Apple quietly acquired a company called Cor, after then-CEO Bob Messerschmidt reportedly sent Jobs a cold email on the topic of sensor technologies for health and wellness. Messerschmidt later joined the Apple Watch team.

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Alien Yoga, anyone? – Everyday Diabetes

Alien Yoga, anyone?

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Forget about beer yoga or AquaPole, alien yoga is the latest craze in fitness these days and is taking social media by storm. The signature move is to contort your stomach into odd shapes that look like the classic Hollywood version of an alien.

But don’t fret, of course there’s a basis for this move. It’s called Nauli and is supposed to cleanse the digestive system and strengthen the core through a series of abdominal movements.

Independent.co.uk reports:

Otherwise known as Nauli, the traditional yoga move involves exhaling completely, isolating the abdomen and pulling it under the ribcage.

Then the abdominal muscles are contracted and released to create a mesmerising side-by-side rolling motion.

Said to promote digestion and help strengthen the core, ‘Alien Yoga’ is nothing new but the practice of Nauli is not something we typically see taught in classes.

Read more here.

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About Us – Everyday Diabetes

About Us

Welcome!

EveryDay Diabetes is an online digital information news source for people with diabetes to provide them with the necessary tools, clarity and confidence to win at work, succeed in life and reach their potential.

Our goal is simple – to provide reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.

Our digital magazine, EveryDay Diabetes, offers up-to-date news, practical information on food & drink, body & mind, gadgets & tech, lifestyle & leisure, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.

On this website, you’ll find a variety of tips, knowledge, and insights about diabetes self-care written by health-care professionals and people with diabetes, as well as reports about late-breaking diabetes news. You can also sign up for our free newsletter and receive the latest diabetes news delivered straight to your inbox.

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Publisher: Michael Conforme
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Editor in Chief: Bobby McGill
editor@everydaydiabetes.com
Partnerships & Marketing: Emma Kim
partners@everydaydiabetes.com 
Copy Editor: Michael Reese
Contributing Writers:

About Us – Everyday Diabetes

About Us

Welcome!

EveryDay Diabetes is an online digital information news source for people with diabetes to provide them with the necessary tools, clarity and confidence to win at work, succeed in life and reach their potential.

Our goal is simple – to provide reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.

Our digital magazine, EveryDay Diabetes, offers up-to-date news, practical information on food & drink, body & mind, gadgets & tech, lifestyle & leisure, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.

On this website, you’ll find a variety of tips, knowledge, and insights about diabetes self-care written by health-care professionals and people with diabetes, as well as reports about late-breaking diabetes news. You can also sign up for our free newsletter and receive the latest diabetes news delivered straight to your inbox.

Contact us

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Your Message

Everyday Diabetes Staff

Publisher: Michael Conforme
publisher@everydaydiabetes.com
Editor in Chief: Bobby McGill
editor@everydaydiabetes.com
Partnerships & Marketing: Emma Kim
partners@everydaydiabetes.com 
Copy Editor: Michael Reese
Contributing Writers: