Category Archives: advice

Drinking Vinegar Before Bedtime Helps Control Diabetes Says Study – Everyday Diabetes

Drinking Vinegar Before Bedtime Helps Control Diabetes Says Study

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Have type 2 diabetes? A study suggests that you take vinegar before bedtime and it impacts waking glucose concentrations in a good way.

Acetic acid, the active ingredient in vinegar, has an anti-glycemic effect that has been attributed to reduced starch digestion and/or delayed gastric emptying. Why is this important? It may benefit those with type 2 diabetes who experience metabolic disturbances that lead to a pre-breakfast rise in fasting glucose, which is also known as the “dawn phenomenon”.

ABC10 reports:

“For type two diabetes, apple cider vinegar can be very helpful, but it is not recommended for anyone with type 1 diabetes because it can worsen symptoms,” said Karina Knight to ABC10.com, a registered Dietitian and Nutritionist.  When it comes to type 1 diabetes, there have been links that say apple cider vinegar can worsen the glycemic control in your body. This makes it very important for asking your doctor if you are looking to try apple cider vinegar.

Read more here.

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Tips to Manage Your Diabetes During Cold and Flu Season – Everyday Diabetes

Tips to Manage Your Diabetes During Cold and Flu Season

Cold and Flu season is coming as the weather cools down. Here are some tips and tricks to help you manage diabetes while fending off colds and the flu at the same time.

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If you have type 2 diabetes, getting through the flu might mean more than just the usual meds and bed rest. Over-the-counter cold medications should be chosen carefully. Don’t just take something because your colleagues are taking it or the commercial on TV was convincing.

Consulting with your doctor, especially if there will be changes in your current medication dose, is of utmost importance. You wouldn’t want to deal with the more serious implications later on.


Go Sugar-Free on Your Cold Medicine

Internist Danny Sam, M.D., told EverydayHealth.com that most cold and flu medications contain high glucose, especially cough syrups. Sam specializes in adult diabetes and is the Residency Program Director at Kaiser Permanente in Santa Clara, California.

He strongly suggests getting sugar-free cold medicine. Seek out the help of your pharmacist if you have trouble looking for it, but in most cases, every pharmacy carries a sugar-free cold or flu medicine, so it’s not a problem.

More Blood Sugar Checks

Sam adds that when you are ill, your diabetes is not well controlled, no matter how sufficiently you follow your usual protocols. This is because, in response to an infection, your body releases a series of chemical reactions that result in a change in your glucose and insulin response.

This is why it is imperative to check your blood sugar more often than usual. The recommendation is to check your blood sugar at least four times a day. If your level goes higher than 300 mg/dL, you should also check for ketones in your urine.

Over the counter cold and flu medications aren’t the only ones that can affect your blood sugar levels, the following drugs can also affect you if you take them whilst sick:

  • Can lower blood sugar levels: Aspirin and some antibiotics (if taking oral diabetes medications)
  • Can raise blood sugar levels: Decongestants

cold-and-fluPlan Modifications

Sam advises, “You have to monitor your blood sugar more frequently and you may have to adjust your meds.” Different health conditions cause either an increase in the blood sugar, or a decrease. For example, those who have diarrhea may suffer from low blood sugar.

Fortunately, your doctor should be able to instruct you on how to adjust your medications, especially if your blood sugar level remains higher than 240 mg/dL for more than 24 hours.

But if you want to prepare yourself before the storm comes, you can discuss with your doctor how to modify your medications, even before you get sick; this way you don’t go to them while covered in multiple layers of clothing and a blanket with a stuffed nose.

You will have to find out the range of blood sugar change that is acceptable, and what to do if it gets out of range. In the midst of all this, you should also know that continuously taking your diabetes medications is a must. Unless, of course, you’ve been instructed by your healthcare provider otherwise.

No Meds, No Problem

Flu comes and goes as the season changes. Fortunately you won’t feel like this all the time. Here are some simple tips and tricks that you can do to help alleviate your condition:

  • Water. Water. Water. There’s no better cure to combat dehydration, especially when you’re vomiting, than to drink a lot of fluids. Take small sips frequently.
  • Small bites. You will dread eating, but you should munch on small portions of soup or milk, or small quantities of wafers, apples, etc.
  • Take note. You should be able to remember all the medications that you took, for your diabetes and for your cough/cold, so you can refer to them later.

Prevention Is Always Better Than Cure.

Nobody wants to get the flu. So if you have type 2 diabetes, keeping your blood sugar controlled is your best bet. As mentioned before, if your blood sugar levels are spiking or declining, it’s harder for your body to fend off infections that can lead to flu.

Getting your flu vaccinations yearly, and other kinds of vaccines recommended for you, is also helpful.

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The Low Down on Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes – Everyday Diabetes

The Low Down on Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes

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You’re probably spending hours working out if you have type 2 diabetes. And why won’t you? Getting your weight down and sweating it out have numerous benefits, and it’s also the first thing your doctor advise you to do – lose weight.

But did you know that just a five to ten percent reduction from your starting weight can have significant effects on blood glucose levels? So slow down a bit and be aware of how much exercise do you really need. You’d be surprised to know that you’re probably doing too much.

Rd.com reports:

Exercise will not only help control blood sugar levels but also help you shed weight and keep your heart healthy. It’s important you keep an eye on your blood sugar because any physical activity makes you more sensitive to insulin.

Endocrinologists suggest type 2 diabetics get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity exercises like brisk walking or an equivalent. Flexibility and strength training are also encouraged. If doing 30 minutes in one session sounds daunting, no worries. You can spread it out over the course of the day.

Read more here.

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5 Thirst-quenching Infused Water Favorites You Need To Try – Everyday Diabetes

5 Thirst-quenching Infused Water Favorites You Need To Try

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The benefits of water are endless. Crucial for nutrition, energy and vitality, humble H20 is the ultimate building block for a healthy lifestyle.

Although it may be important, the thought of drinking glass after glass of plain old water doesn’t seem too appealing. Thankfully, Rooi’s range of sports water bottles are the perfect way to make deliciously-infused recipes that promise to give an energising boost – each and every time.

Here’s a few of our personal favourites.


Citrus infusions

infused-water-citrusBrimming with nutritional boosters and benefits – vitamin C-rich citrus fruits are the ideal ingredient for an enriching infused water.

Much more than just a natural sweetener, fruits rich in vitamin C contain super-antioxidants that work to keep your skin nourished and aid in the healing of wounds and blemishes. Not only that, it works to combat the effects of free radicals on the body – harmful molecules that help to develop diseases such as heart disease and arthritis.  

Traditional options such as limes, lemons and oranges work perfectly. However, for a much more diverse flavour, try clementines, mandarins or grapefruit to give a zingy, zesty taste.

Fresh fruit water

fruit-infusion-strawberryThanks to their emergence as a so-called ‘superfood’, it’s no wonder we have seen an increase in berry sales over the past few years.

Traditionally found along Britain’s picturesque footpaths, their natural sweetness and versatility make berries the ultimate fruit for perfectly balanced infused water. When incorporated into a healthy diet, the fibre found in berries can contribute to tackling weight loss – particularly raspberries.

Raspberries and blackberries work perfectly together, whilst strawberries possess a unique ability to be partnered with a huge variety of ingredients. Delicious with both mint and basil for a complex flavour.

Herbal infusions

herbal-infusionHerbs are filled with a wide variety of health benefits. Sage has been found to tackle Alzheimer’s, whilst thyme and oregano are packed with powerful antioxidants.

Although the flavour of herbs has always leant towards savoury cooking, when twinned with certain fruits they deliver a beautifully intricate flavour. Extremely easy to source and grow, herbs are incredibly popular for maintaining healthy skin. Peppermint contains menthol, which helps to cool the skin and lemongrass naturally minimises oil secretion – combating skin irritation in the process.

Our personal favourite water bottle concoctions are bananas and parsley, thyme with pears and cherries and mint paired with watermelon.

Chilled teas

chilled-teaGreen tea has long been famed for its ability to enhance sporting performance and weight loss.

Although more commonly perceived as a hot drink, when served chilled in our drinkware, its spicy, aromatic notes shine through.

Herbal tea remedies – especially those containing thyme – work to assist kidney function. By doing so, it helps to promote clearer skin, as any toxins are ‘flushed out’.

The lively qualities of lemon and lime work brilliantly with green tea, whilst adding a touch of black tea to a raspberry-based infusion makes for a deliciously refreshing replacement for your standard mug of tea.

Superfood water

superfoodThe superfood has been the definitive ‘buzzword’ of the food and drink industry for a few years now, and unsurprisingly – it has become a must-have ingredient for infused water recipes.

The beauty of superfoods, whatever the latest trend may be, is that they are filled to the brim with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals – all promoting a healthy lifestyle. Pomegranate (bone strength), watermelon (healthy blood flow) and beetroot (combats skin problems) are some of the most popular choices – and ideal for infused water recipes.

This year’s superfood of choice has been the naturally sweet and immune-boosting goji berry. When mixed with pomegranate or blueberries, it creates an exhilarating and fresh taste. Packed with vitamin C, A, iron and fibre – it is the perfect drink to satisfy your thirst.

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Could Pasta be the Unlikely Weight-loss food You’re Looking For? – Everyday Diabetes

Could Pasta be the Unlikely Weight-loss food You’re Looking For?

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If you were compiling a list of the best weight-loss foods to add to your diet, you’d be forgiven for omitting pasta.

We’re forever being told that in order to shed pounds, we need to be cutting right back on complex carbohydrates. However, a new study from Italy (where else!) has suggested that pasta is not fattening and could actually help to reduce the likelihood of obesity.

Much to the delight of spaghetti lovers everywhere, the Neuromed Institute research – published in the Nature & Diabetes Journal – concluded that as part of a healthy, balanced diet (this is a crucial detail) we can enjoy pasta without fearing for our waistlines.

George Pounis, who co-authored the report, commented: “We have seen that consumption of pasta, contrary to what many think, is not associated with an increase in body weight, rather the opposite.

“Our data show that enjoying pasta according to individuals’ needs contributes to a healthy body mass index, lower waist circumference and better waist-hip ratio.”

What makes pasta healthy?

While the aforementioned research shouldn’t be held as gospel, it underlines the point that you don’t need to remove pasta from your diet if you’re looking to lose weight.

Here are a few of the benefits of eating pasta:

  • It provides glucose, which fuels your muscles and brain.
  • Pasta provides a slow release of energy, whereas sugary foods, for example, give you a quick fix and a more dramatic crash.
  • According to the US National Pasta Association, enriched versions of the food can be a great source of folic acid, which is particularly important for pregnant women.
  • Pasta has a low GI (30 to 60), although this increases the more it is cooked. There’s a top tip! A low GI means you digest the food more slowly, so you feel full for longer, thus reducing the need to get more calories on board (in theory).
  • As this study published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows, it’s calories that result in weight gain, regardless of whether they’ve come from carbs, proteins or fats. Granted, this isn’t strictly a benefit, but it further dispels the myth that carbs are evil.

How much pasta are you recommended to eat?

At risk of being accused of stating the obvious; if you eat lots and lots of pasta and little else – especially the heavily-processed stuff – there’s a good chance you will put on weight.

The Neuromed Institute study clearly stated that pasta can be an effective weight-loss food IF eaten in moderation and as part of a healthy Mediterranean diet.

Speaking to the Daily Mail, Dr Aseem Malhotra, advisor to the National Obesity Forum, said that the people who took part in the study ate around 50g to 60g of pasta a day, which is a lot less than you’d expect to find in a main meal.

That said, NHS Choices suggests that starchy foods – which includes pasta – should make up just over one-third of your daily food intake.

DW Fitness Clubs personal trainer and expert nutritionist, Carly Tierney, told us:

“You should make sure you eat some carbs for every meal, so pasta is awesome for lunch or dinner. Carbs like pasta are also great to eat pre-workout as they provide your body with fuel which helps you to push during training.”

Why is whole grain pasta so popular?

The UK consumes 2.5kg of pasta per capita – by comparison Italy consumes 25.3kg per capita and the US 8.8kg per capita – so it’s already an important part of many of our diets.

Again, it’s worth stressing that not all forms of pasta are the same. Carly added that when buying pasta (as with any food) you should “focus on quality”.

“The best varieties of pasta contain high amounts of protein and fibre. Check the labels and steer clear of varieties that have added ingredients. Also don’t be fooled by seemingly healthy varieties of spinach and tomato pastas. They often contain very little actual veg – certainly not enough to meet one of your recommended five-a-day – and are often white pasta with food dye in to give them a vibrant colour,” she commented.

As we’ve already touched on, expert nutritionists will tend to steer you towards wholegrain pasta, rather than standard white versions.

According to SELF Nutrition Data, 100g of cooked wholewheat spaghetti contains 124 calories, 27g of carbohydrate and 5g of protein.

By contrast, the same source tells us that 100g of standard white spaghetti contains 158 calories, 31g of carbohydrate and 6g of protein.

As you can see, the lower calorie count works in the favour of brown pasta and it’s also worth noting that wholegrain pastas offer more than twice as much dietary fibre than white variations.

What are healthy alternatives to pasta?

Maybe you don’t even like pasta at all (at which point we’d question how you’ve got so far through this article). Not to worry, Carly has some handy alternatives for you.

Rice pasta made with brown rice – “This is a good option for those following a gluten-free diet or for those who have a sensitive stomach. Rice versions tend to be easier to digest.”

Quinoa pasta -“This is also great for those who are gluten-free. It has a nutty taste and texture and is jam packed with nutrients.”

Bean pasta – “This is made using beans, lentils or chickpeas. This pasta will keep you feeling full for longer and actually tastes really good and not at all ‘beany’ as you may expect.”

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Could Pasta be the Unlikely Weight-loss food You’re Looking For? – Everyday Diabetes

Could Pasta be the Unlikely Weight-loss food You’re Looking For?

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If you were compiling a list of the best weight-loss foods to add to your diet, you’d be forgiven for omitting pasta.

We’re forever being told that in order to shed pounds, we need to be cutting right back on complex carbohydrates. However, a new study from Italy (where else!) has suggested that pasta is not fattening and could actually help to reduce the likelihood of obesity.

Much to the delight of spaghetti lovers everywhere, the Neuromed Institute research – published in the Nature & Diabetes Journal – concluded that as part of a healthy, balanced diet (this is a crucial detail) we can enjoy pasta without fearing for our waistlines.

George Pounis, who co-authored the report, commented: “We have seen that consumption of pasta, contrary to what many think, is not associated with an increase in body weight, rather the opposite.

“Our data show that enjoying pasta according to individuals’ needs contributes to a healthy body mass index, lower waist circumference and better waist-hip ratio.”

What makes pasta healthy?

While the aforementioned research shouldn’t be held as gospel, it underlines the point that you don’t need to remove pasta from your diet if you’re looking to lose weight.

Here are a few of the benefits of eating pasta:

  • It provides glucose, which fuels your muscles and brain.
  • Pasta provides a slow release of energy, whereas sugary foods, for example, give you a quick fix and a more dramatic crash.
  • According to the US National Pasta Association, enriched versions of the food can be a great source of folic acid, which is particularly important for pregnant women.
  • Pasta has a low GI (30 to 60), although this increases the more it is cooked. There’s a top tip! A low GI means you digest the food more slowly, so you feel full for longer, thus reducing the need to get more calories on board (in theory).
  • As this study published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows, it’s calories that result in weight gain, regardless of whether they’ve come from carbs, proteins or fats. Granted, this isn’t strictly a benefit, but it further dispels the myth that carbs are evil.

How much pasta are you recommended to eat?

At risk of being accused of stating the obvious; if you eat lots and lots of pasta and little else – especially the heavily-processed stuff – there’s a good chance you will put on weight.

The Neuromed Institute study clearly stated that pasta can be an effective weight-loss food IF eaten in moderation and as part of a healthy Mediterranean diet.

Speaking to the Daily Mail, Dr Aseem Malhotra, advisor to the National Obesity Forum, said that the people who took part in the study ate around 50g to 60g of pasta a day, which is a lot less than you’d expect to find in a main meal.

That said, NHS Choices suggests that starchy foods – which includes pasta – should make up just over one-third of your daily food intake.

DW Fitness Clubs personal trainer and expert nutritionist, Carly Tierney, told us:

“You should make sure you eat some carbs for every meal, so pasta is awesome for lunch or dinner. Carbs like pasta are also great to eat pre-workout as they provide your body with fuel which helps you to push during training.”

Why is whole grain pasta so popular?

The UK consumes 2.5kg of pasta per capita – by comparison Italy consumes 25.3kg per capita and the US 8.8kg per capita – so it’s already an important part of many of our diets.

Again, it’s worth stressing that not all forms of pasta are the same. Carly added that when buying pasta (as with any food) you should “focus on quality”.

“The best varieties of pasta contain high amounts of protein and fibre. Check the labels and steer clear of varieties that have added ingredients. Also don’t be fooled by seemingly healthy varieties of spinach and tomato pastas. They often contain very little actual veg – certainly not enough to meet one of your recommended five-a-day – and are often white pasta with food dye in to give them a vibrant colour,” she commented.

As we’ve already touched on, expert nutritionists will tend to steer you towards wholegrain pasta, rather than standard white versions.

According to SELF Nutrition Data, 100g of cooked wholewheat spaghetti contains 124 calories, 27g of carbohydrate and 5g of protein.

By contrast, the same source tells us that 100g of standard white spaghetti contains 158 calories, 31g of carbohydrate and 6g of protein.

As you can see, the lower calorie count works in the favour of brown pasta and it’s also worth noting that wholegrain pastas offer more than twice as much dietary fibre than white variations.

What are healthy alternatives to pasta?

Maybe you don’t even like pasta at all (at which point we’d question how you’ve got so far through this article). Not to worry, Carly has some handy alternatives for you.

Rice pasta made with brown rice – “This is a good option for those following a gluten-free diet or for those who have a sensitive stomach. Rice versions tend to be easier to digest.”

Quinoa pasta -“This is also great for those who are gluten-free. It has a nutty taste and texture and is jam packed with nutrients.”

Bean pasta – “This is made using beans, lentils or chickpeas. This pasta will keep you feeling full for longer and actually tastes really good and not at all ‘beany’ as you may expect.”

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Check Out these Healthy Foods to Feed Your Skin and Get it Looking its Best – Everyday Diabetes

Check Out these Healthy Foods to Feed Your Skin and Get it Looking its Best

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Many of us long for naturally glowing skin without wanting to break the bank achieving it; however, many of the key ingredients you need are probably in your kitchen cupboard not in your bathroom cupboard! Clear Spring has put together a list of natural foods that can help you get your skin looking its best.

Oats

With advocates including the likes of Gwyneth Paltrow and the Duchess of Cambridge, using oats in your daily skin care routine might be the key to giving you that Hollywood glow.  The parchment-like texture of oats makes them an effective exfoliator for those with very sensitive skin.

Oats are effective in fighting dull, flaky dryness as they contain polysaccharides, which become gelatinous in water. They form a fine protective film when applied on the skin.  Furthermore, their lipids and protein content also allows them to nourish and moisturize, making them the ultimate skin soother. Try wrapping a handful of Nairn’s rolled oats in a small piece of muslin cloth for an easy homemade natural body scrub that cleanses and hydrates.

Raw Cacao

Another natural skin booster that can be found in the kitchen is raw cacao.  Full of potent antioxidants, it can help reduce inflammation and puffiness. Apply a small amount of melted raw cacao – the higher cacao quality the better – such as OMBAR 90% Cacao, to the face and leave for 5 – 10 minutes then rinse with tepid water.

Sesame Oil

Oils are a 3-in-1 staple that will transform your beauty regime. Use either to remove stubborn mascara or as a hair mask. It’s also great to use as a moisturizer before you shower to lock in that essential moisture keep your skin smooth and silky throughout the day.

Pomegranate

If you’re looking for a new exfoliator, try crushing pomegranate seeds for a natural remedy. When the seeds are ground up they release their antioxidant nutrients thus exfoliating and nourishing your skin at the same time.

Matcha

Due to its high content of chlorophyll Matcha powder is a powerful detoxifier. This allows it to deeply cleanse the skin and help reduce inflammation while at the same time not containing any harsh chemicals. If you choose high-grade Matcha powder such as Clearspring’s Matcha shot you can simply mix with few drops of water, or plain yogurt for a thicker consistency, for a natural face mask that will soothe and nourish the skin.

Avocado

Avocado may be the Instagram-food-of-the-moment but did you know it’s also a staple of Kim Kardashian’s skincare regime? The healthy fats in avocados naturally moisturize your skin and reduce any inflammation. The oils of avocado are also very closely matched to the natural oils in your skin, so it will nourish and help to restore your skin’s glow at the end of a busy day. For a natural avocado facemask simply mix mashed avocado with Greek yogurt and honey and leave for 5- 10 minutes and then wash off with warm water.

Green Tea

Next time you indulge in a facemask, ditch the cucumber and opt for dampened Green Tea teabags. Their natural anti-oxidants will help to reduce puffiness and dark circles around the eyes, leaving you feeling fresh faced with any traces of tiredness banished!

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Goodbye Belly Fat – 14 Ways to Slim Down for Spring – Everyday Diabetes

Goodbye Belly Fat – 14 Ways to Slim Down for Spring

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Staying in shape is something that seems to be on everyone’s mind in the modern world taken over by social media.

Ask most people and one of the most frustrating areas of their bodies is their bellies. Belly fat is slightly different than other fat deposits on the body – it is called visceral fat.

These pesky “tires” of fat are actually early indicators of health issues leading to increased risks such as heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer markers, strokes, metabolic imbalances and other serious health conditions.

It is where the truth speaks – of your lifestyle choices, be it that cheeky glass of wine, cold beer with your mates, a few cubes of cheeses, that little square of chocolate and those birthday cupcakes passed around in the office.


Eliminate fast and junky food

Sure, it may be quick, easy and perhaps tasty to pick up that cheesy pizza or burger with fries but think twice as it can be a disaster for your diet and belly fat-burning plans. The nasty combination of saturated fats, grease, and unwanted triglycerides found in fast food is precisely what you don’t want in your body if you’re trying to burn calories and reduce visceral fat, so whilst it might be tempting, cutting out fast food has to be the top of your list.

Eat your CCCs – Celery, Cucumbers, Cabbage. During my bikini-bodybuilding contest prep days, I always turn to “Cindy’s triple Cs”

Low-calorie, ‘free’ food with high nutritional value, packed with dietary fiber, water content, minerals and essential vitamins. Celery, cucumbers and cabbage can fill you up and optimize your metabolism and fill you up with minimum calories. Knock yourself out with these items and look for interesting ways to eat them – blended in juices or smoothies, chopped up finely to be hidden in eggwhite omelettes, spiralized into ‘veggie-hetti”, finely chopped in soups, julienned into veggie sticks served with interesting low-cal dips such as eggplant (babaganoush), beetroot, chickpeas (hummus – but watch out for too much tahini or olive oil!), use your imagination to meet your RDI of 5 servings of vegetables daily.

push up workout - Everyday Diabetes MagazinePolyunsaturated and monounsaturated Fats

Eating the right kinds of fats is crucial if you want to cut down on your belly fat. Some fats will only contribute more to visceral fat, such as saturated fats, but if consumed in calculated and measured amounts of polyunsaturated fats, like those typically found in seeds and nuts (preferred sources are flaxseeds, sunflower seeds, almonds, walnuts), and certain types of fish (deep-sea, oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, sardines, tuna), you can benefit from their anti-inflammatory potential and cholesterol-balancing activities that can assist in reducing your visceral fat levels. Funnily enough, your body actually needs fat to burn fat.

Gone are the days of the 90s low-fat diet. Sugar is the modern day culprit. Funnily enough, your body actually needs fat to burn fat. Gone were the days of the 90s low-fat diet. Sugar is the modern day culprit.

Stay Active

A sedentary lifestyle is highly associated with visceral fat, not only because it usually means a lack of physical exercise, but also because its associated with lower metabolic levels, higher intake of unhealthy food, and psychological effects such as stress, a lack of motivation, and guilt. By staying active as much as possible (taking the stairs instead of the elevator, standing up while working, or taking a bike to work), you can keep your physical and mental energy high, preventing the development of belly fat. Incorporate incidental exercise in your daily routine and invest in a wearable fitness-tracking timepiece to keep your steps and elevation on record!

Get your beauty sleep

Research has shown that regulating your sleep scheduled and ensuring that you get more than 6 hours per night of sleep can help you reduce your visceral fat stores. However, if you turn around and sleep in two days a week (Saturday and Sunday), it can add to your visceral fat. Essentially, make a firm sleep pattern to stick by, but don’t let your body get too lazy on your days off. Regularity in your Circadian rhythms and metabolic cycles will be helpful for keeping belly fat in check.

Combining Workout Styles

While many people think that cardiovascular workouts are the best possible way to burn belly fat, combining your sweat interests is actually a better way to quickly lose belly fat. When you do weight training in between cardio exercising, that high-intensity exercise can cause your metabolism to shoot up, burning more fat more quickly. Alternating workout styles and physical demands on your body can keep your metabolism “on its toes”, operating at a high level, even burning fat when you’re not working out!

Relaxation

Studies have shown that both men and women have seen significant reductions in visceral fat stores when adding some down-time to their workout and health regimens. Meditation and Yoga promote flexibility and eliminates excess stress hormones from your body, namely cortisol. There is a direct link between chronic stress, cortisol levels, and belly fat, so clear your mind, calm down and carry on.

Drink water

Needless to say, drink at least 1-2 liters of water daily to keep hydrated, detoxify, your brains sharp and helping you feel fuller! The actual amount of consumption depends on your activity levels and your vital stats.

Vinegar

It might not sound pleasant, but anecdotal evidence says that zero-calorie vinegar can actually be an effective means of burning belly fat. Drinking a dollop of apple cider vinegar or plain white vinegar can help detox and reduce visceral fat, and while the research on this is somewhat limited, it is believed that the acids in vinegar stimulate the production of certain amino acids that burn visceral fat.

As usual, choose unfiltered organic ones. Braggs and Field Day make good organic apple cider vinegar.

High Dietary Fiber

Any foods with high concentrations of dietary fiber can help to reduce inflammation throughout the body, balance HDL/LDL (good to bad ratio) of cholesterol, regulate your digestive system, and optimize your nutrient intake, all of which can help improve the metabolism and burn more belly fat.

Cut Out Starch

Starch is a major source of empty calories that can easily be translated into visceral fat due to its high-calorie content and sugar starches. If you’re a big pasta, white bread, potatoes, rice, refined wheat eater, put those to the side if you’re trying to burn belly fat.

Grab a handful of leafy greens such as baby spinach or cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, or Brussel sprouts instead. If you must have it, portion control. You shouldn’t have more than 2-3 oz per serve, make it a small side dish rather than the main course. Always choose unprocessed, unrefined carbs over white and processed carbs.

Eat Smaller Meals Slower

By eating smaller meal portions, and consuming them slower, will allow your body time to process what it is taking in before releasing those enzymes that tell the body it’s “full”. Also, smaller portions allow you to eat more meals per day, which keeps your metabolism and digestive system active and engaged for longer, which is great for burning belly fat!

Push Yourself Physically: Somewhat related to the combining exercise style advice, pushing yourself past the normal “threshold” is a great way to burn belly fat. If you regularly work out, but hardly break a sweat and don’t feel “challenged”, then your body probably won’t respond by charging its metabolism and burning those visceral fat cells. However, surprising your body with varied workout styles AND intensities, beyond what you normally do, can kick-start your system very quickly.

Disrupt Your Routine: Eating the same types of food at the exact same time of day or exercising the same old routines can cause your body to fall into an unwanted predictability. Occasionally, you need to experiment consuming different foods, nutrients, vitamins, minerals, organic compounds, etc. in order to keep your metabolism flexible and your system dynamic and responsive.

If you can handle a bit of heat, adding chili and spice can also rev up your digestion and burn a few more calories. Small amounts of caffeine found in green tea (as well as catchetins, fat-burning antioxidant compound) and organic fair-trade coffee are fine to get you through your busy day.

See you in the gym!

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Getting and Staying in Shape – Simple Rules to Live by – Everyday Diabetes

Getting and Staying in Shape – Simple Rules to Live by

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One of the hardest things about exercising is exercising. As silly as that might sound, it’s true. Actually getting out there and doing it, taking that first step, is often the most difficult one of all.

Whatever your targets are, sticking to these simple rules will help you achieve your smart fitness goals. Go for it!


Intensity over Duration

Just because you’ve been in the gym for 2 hours doesn’t mean you’ve had an effective workout. Interval training will burn those extra calories in a shorter space of time. Don’t fool yourself, if you’re reading a magazine on the treadmill or flicking through newspapers on a bike (I have seen this plenty of times before), you are definitely not working hard enough. If you take your training seriously, you can’t multi-task.

Weight training is key

The more muscle you have the more calories you’ll burn. It is as simple as that. Ladies, did you say: “I don’t want to bulk up”?  You won’t… Women simply do not have the testosterone levels to sustain muscle gain as fast as men. If still skeptical, just adapt higher reps and lighter weights to increase tone and shape. Gents, heavier weights and fewer reps for you to increase size, adapt your reps, weights and rest periods between sets.

Fitness body and mind Diabetes - Everyday DiabetesTry to use your body as a whole

Total body weight exercises, functional training and multi-dimensional cross-fit type routines will work multiple areas at the same time whilst integrating the core. Important to jack-up your heart rate and muscle burn in your training. Instead of doing an old-school static lunge, incorporate forward and backward-stepping alternating lunge (sagittal plane) by adding a torso rotation twist whilst holding a weighted medicine ball to train the transverse plane at once.

Stretch!

Stretching will ensure a balanced body and mind, whilst relieving any aches and pains following your high intensity workout. I used to have no time for it, but hot yoga is now my favorite way to challenge my strength, core stability, flexibility and endurance, testing my focus and pain threshold in a different dimension yet somehow I manage to walk out feeling totally de-stressed and light-weight every time.

Eat to lose weight

Eating little but often will keep your metabolism high. Something wholesome, natural, unprocessed, ‘paleo’ and healthy of course. Avoid anything nasty including refined carbos, oils, deep-fried, sugars, salts, sauces and dressings. Avoid eating out of a packet (unless they are natural wholegrains such as quinoa, barley, brown rice, old-fashion rolled-oats, they are usually processed food). Each time you feel ‘peckish’, drinking something nutritional (such as protein shakes, skim milk, low-fat soy-milk, fresh vegetable juices) will ensure that you stay well hydrated and those pounds will eventually come off.

Sticking to these very simple rules will give you a beautiful body, inside and out.

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Embrace the cold! Study Says it Eases Type 2 Diabetes – Everyday Diabetes

Embrace the cold! Study Says it Eases Type 2 Diabetes

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It may not seem like the perfect way to spend winter indoors, but lowering the room temperature makes those with type 2 Diabetes more comfortable. Not to mention it slightly improves their condition. Researchers at Maastricht University Medical Centre, in The Netherlands, advise turning the thermostat down to between 15C and 19C for a few hours a day.

Mirror.co.uk reports:

When a group of type 2 diabetics was asked to make the change for 10 days, it increased insulin sensitivity by more than 40 percent, a result comparable with the best medicines that are currently available.

The authors suggest that temperatures in modern buildings, such as homes and offices, should shift between warm and cool through the day in order to support health.

Read more here.

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Dietary Supplements for Diabetics: Yay or Nay? – Everyday Diabetes

Dietary Supplements for Diabetics: Yay or Nay?

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There is a myriad of supplements available in your nearest drugstore claiming that they’re diabetes-friendly, but the question is, should you take these?  More than 50 percent of people with diabetes say they’ve used dietary supplements, according to one 2011 study—and at least one in four has given herbal remedies a try.

Some studies have been done on consumption of specific supplements, like omega-3 and probiotic, as a treatment for diabetes and risk reduction, respectfully. Vitamin D, omega-3, magnesium, psyllium, cinnamon, and alpha-lipoic acid, may have some potential benefits for diabetics according to an article published by Reader’s Digest. They also added that fenugreek, chromium, and bitter melon should be avoided.

RD.com reports:

In consulting the latest research as well as supplement experts for this report on the best-studied and most widely used supplements, we found that some popular pills—chromium, we’re talking about you—aren’t living up to their reputations. Others, such as vitamin D or psyllium, may be more promising. Still others should be avoided because they make false claims (supplements that promote weight loss tend to be a red flag).

Read more here.

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Some Helpful Tips for a Diabetic Partner – Everyday Diabetes

Some Helpful Tips for a Diabetic Partner

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It’s uncanny, but according to researchers at McGill University, if your partner is a type 2 diabetic, there’s a 26% chance that you will likely develop it too.

Although there’s no specific reason as to why this is happening, speculations include that the partners might be skipping physical activities and engaging in unhealthy eating habits, or that perhaps the more you know about diabetes, the more you see the symptoms develop in yourself.

Whatever the reason is, since you are the partner, and most likely the primary caregiver, you should be able to take care of yourself first to be able to look after your diabetic loved one.

Here are some tips on how you and your partnership can remain healthy.


Arm Yourself with Knowledge

You don’t need to be a health professional to know about diabetes, but a little bit of information and understanding can help the relationship a lot. It makes you and your partner feel equipped in case of an emergency, and it also makes you empathize and be present in their lives.

Open and Regular Communication

Yes, diabetes is present, but it doesn’t mean it has to be the center of the relationship; however, it can’t be disregarded either. Thoughts and feelings should be shared to one another. 

Linda Bloom, MSW, LCSW, told Diabetes Forecast, “If you go down the road of the sacrificial martyr, you end up cranky, burnt out, and more likely to develop illness yourself.” It is important to meet both partner’s needs halfway.

Healthy Changes Should Be Done Together

It’s hard enough managing your own diabetic diet, much less one for two people if one is not a diabetic, or maybe one is type 1 and the other type 2. But, with effort, the rewards of working together on what goes best for the both of you are beyond the measure of benefit. Together, always.

Nurture the Relationship

Being in an intimate relationship and having a social support system can boost your health, according to research.  

Mary Pruiett told Diabetes Forecast that her husband has been her support system every single time she reads her glucose levels, “I think it is critical. You can and should be the ‘expert’ in taking care of yourself, but others who are close to you can make that easier and more rewarding.”

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Diabetes 101 – EveryDay Diabetes Magazine

DIABETES 101

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes and you’re on the road to understanding what it all means, your journey starts here.
Here you will find helpful information about diabetes, the lifestyle changes, what you can eat, how you should take care of yourself and more.
A place you can start to make changes in your life for the better.
The Basics About Diabetes - Everyday Diabetes Magazine

The Basics

Diagnosed with diabetes and not sure what it’s all about? Here are the basics to get started. (read more)

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. (read more)

Type 2 Diabetes

Usually discovered in adulthood, it is found increasingly more in young people. (read more)

What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A person’s fasting blood glucose can be measured, or they can take an oral glucose tolerance test determine if they have pre-diabetes. You can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes by keeping to a exercise and diet strategy designed to reduce excess pounds.

Diabetes 101 – EveryDay Diabetes Magazine

DIABETES 101

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes and you’re on the road to understanding what it all means, your journey starts here.
Here you will find helpful information about diabetes, the lifestyle changes, what you can eat, how you should take care of yourself and more.
A place you can start to make changes in your life for the better.
The Basics About Diabetes - Everyday Diabetes Magazine

The Basics

Diagnosed with diabetes and not sure what it’s all about? Here are the basics to get started. (read more)

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. (read more)

Type 2 Diabetes

Usually discovered in adulthood, it is found increasingly more in young people. (read more)

What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is a condition when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A person’s fasting blood glucose can be measured, or they can take an oral glucose tolerance test determine if they have pre-diabetes. You can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes by keeping to a exercise and diet strategy designed to reduce excess pounds.

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Customer feedback is the lifeblood of our business. Tell us what’s on your mind, good or bad, we are always happy to get your input.

We respond to all customer feedback and look forward to hearing from you!

Want to write for us? Know a good story we should feature? Great! We’d love to hear about it. Drop us a line.

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Ask Dr. Sally: ‘Can I Become Overweight from Healthy Food?’ – Everyday Diabetes

Ask Dr. Sally: ‘Can I Become Overweight from Healthy Food?’

Dr. Sally Norton is an NHS weight loss consultant and founder of www.vavistalife.com. She’s happy to answer questions you might have about healthy living.

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Dr. Sally Norton - Everyday Diabetes Magazine
Dr. Sally Norton

Q:

“I’m proud of the fact that I don’t eat junk food and stick with healthy foods. But my friend said that I can still put on weight eating “healthy” foods. Is that true?”

A:

Eating healthily is always a good thing: the benefits go beyond weight.  But there are other considerations that you need to take into account if you want to lose weight long term by eating healthily.  

Consider the following:

Good foods need to come in good portions.   For example, nuts are full of vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats. However, the key is sticking to a handful! Nuts are high in calories – and are very moreish…so before you know it you can consume a quarter of your recommended calories for the day. Same goes for dried fruit; a handful constitutes one of your 5-a-day, but get carried away and the calories soon tot up. Beans, whole grains, yogurt, fruit, olive oil – all carry loads of health benefits but check you aren’t eating them to excess.

 Good foods should be as unadulterated as possible.  Scan the shelves of a health food shop and you will find bags of dried fruit that have more sugar added. As if the natural, concentrated sugar within the dried fruit needs adding to. A big bowl of delicious salad or veg can more than quadruple its calorie count from the added dressing. Sometimes with extra salt and sugar too and don’t forget smoothies with more sugar than a can of coke. Not quite so healthy now.

 We are being duped. Clever manufacturers know that healthy food is a market winner. We are often happy to pay more if we think that a food is good for us. Problem is, unless we look carefully at the small print, we may simply be persuaded to buy when we spot a label that says natural sugars, healthy, organic, whole grain and the like. Yes, it may tick some ‘good’ boxes – but wholegrain muesli bars full of fat and sugar may do us more harm than good. And low-fat, which for years we associated with dieting, may simply mean chock-full of sugar or other agents that improve taste, but add calories.

We may eat more if we feel virtuous:

How many of us feel that we were so good in choosing the salad for main that we deserve the dessert after? Or that in resisting the chocolate bar in favor of the fruit flapjack, we are allowed an extra snack later? It is very easy to fool ourselves that we are eating so healthily that we can indulge more as a result. It’s well recognized – diners told that they are eating healthy food tend to consume larger portions than those who are given the same food but without that information.

 


Dr. Sally Norton is happy to answer questions you might have about health and diet. Send your question to editor@everydaydiabetes.com

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About Us – Everyday Diabetes

About Us

Welcome!

EveryDay Diabetes is an online digital information news source for people with diabetes to provide them with the necessary tools, clarity and confidence to win at work, succeed in life and reach their potential.

Our goal is simple – to provide reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.

Our digital magazine, EveryDay Diabetes, offers up-to-date news, practical information on food & drink, body & mind, gadgets & tech, lifestyle & leisure, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.

On this website, you’ll find a variety of tips, knowledge, and insights about diabetes self-care written by health-care professionals and people with diabetes, as well as reports about late-breaking diabetes news. You can also sign up for our free newsletter and receive the latest diabetes news delivered straight to your inbox.

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Everyday Diabetes Staff

Publisher: Michael Conforme
publisher@everydaydiabetes.com
Editor in Chief: Bobby McGill
editor@everydaydiabetes.com
Partnerships & Marketing: Emma Kim
partners@everydaydiabetes.com 
Copy Editor: Michael Reese
Contributing Writers:

About Us – Everyday Diabetes

About Us

Welcome!

EveryDay Diabetes is an online digital information news source for people with diabetes to provide them with the necessary tools, clarity and confidence to win at work, succeed in life and reach their potential.

Our goal is simple – to provide reliable health information for the growing number of people with diabetes who want to know more about controlling and managing their diabetes.

Our digital magazine, EveryDay Diabetes, offers up-to-date news, practical information on food & drink, body & mind, gadgets & tech, lifestyle & leisure, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.

On this website, you’ll find a variety of tips, knowledge, and insights about diabetes self-care written by health-care professionals and people with diabetes, as well as reports about late-breaking diabetes news. You can also sign up for our free newsletter and receive the latest diabetes news delivered straight to your inbox.

Contact us

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Your Message

Everyday Diabetes Staff

Publisher: Michael Conforme
publisher@everydaydiabetes.com
Editor in Chief: Bobby McGill
editor@everydaydiabetes.com
Partnerships & Marketing: Emma Kim
partners@everydaydiabetes.com 
Copy Editor: Michael Reese
Contributing Writers: